The L.A. Times publishes an important story that gets to the heart of my new book coming out in a few weeks,The Bee Eater. Can dramatic improvements in teacher quality in failing urban schools turn things around? Yes. Those helped the most are those currently hurt the most, black and Latino boys. The fallout, however, may prove politically lethal, as explained in my book....


Dan Willingham always writes in a blunt style I appreciate. What he has to say won't make a lot of boy advocates happy -- those who argue that "brain based" instruction is the solution to the boy troubles....


Considering the number of single-sex programs starting up, it's possible to argue that Leonard Sax and his National Association for Single Sex Public Education rivals Arne Duncan for the person having the most impact on classrooms. Sax steers schools toward single-sex programs, Duncan toward better teacher evaluation and accountability. Here's a taste of Sax's latest work in Syracuse. As a solution, I'm not as focused on single-sex as Sax is. I've seen other reform models work equally well. But I like Sax's directness. Just splitting students by sex and making a few instructional changes won't produce the results you're hoping ...


A seminar on how to direct their giftedness toward school, rather than video games....


David Brooks names the best magazine essays of the year, and Hanna Rosin's Atlantic piece makes the short list. In case you missed that piece, here it is again. The fact that Brooks picked this piece, and that Times columnist Nicholas Kristof chose Why Boys Fail as the subject for a Sunday column are signs of an important development: 2010 was the year when everyone stopped questioning whether males are in trouble and started asking the why question. Too bad it took so long. This is an international issue. Compared to several other countries already trying to deal with the ...


I'm offering no comment on this one....


This Arizona commentator mashes up the boy troubles with military recruiting challenges....


Interesting argument here at Education Week in a teachers blog, reacting to the commentary I wrote with reading professor William Brozo. From the commentary: "We're living through a fundamental international failure of schools and parents to engage boys in literacy skills," write Brozo and Whitmire. To fix this, they suggest making reading more enjoyable for boys. But what do boys like to read? ASCD blogger and president of an education consulting firm Grant Wiggins says it's not fiction books. In fact, he thinks schools should ban most fiction books from the curriculum altogether because they don't prepare students for the ...


Canadians paying attention to gender gaps in Ottawa. Judith Kleinfeld in the article: "The difficulties of boys, however, which span far more areas, have been generally ignored. It is boys who are performing at strikingly lower levels in literacy," she writes in the journal Gender Issues. It is boys who are more likely to quit school early, to be in special education, to have behaviour problems and be suspended or expelled. Boys are far more likely to skip their homework, arrive at school without books or pencils and cause a disturbance that gets them kicked out of class. Boys are ...


That's the conclusion here. The reasons: women are better educated, more suited to the contemporary workforce and didn't lose as many jobs during the recession....


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