Education professor Ali Carr-Chellman appears on NPR to explain her theories about how schools are not designed for boys. They get the message that their rough-and-tumble world is forbidden and conclude that school is for girls, she argues. Her solution:Let's introduce some video games to school. I've blogged about her before. I agree that boys conclude that school is not for them. And I agree that video games are not the villain. I'm less sure that the rough and tumble issue is at the core, however. Schools have never tolerated rowdiness, even back in the days when boys were ...


Want to know why we see such poor reading and writing scores among 17-year-olds, just as they need them the most to take advantage of post-secondary training and education they need? Listen to Hirsch, who lays it out in a Times commentary: Cognitive psychologists agree that early childhood language learning (ages 2 to 10) is critical to later verbal competence, not just because of the remarkable linguistic plasticity of young minds, but also because of the so-called Matthew Effect. The name comes from a passage in the Scriptures: "For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall ...


Great title to what looks to be an interesting book, as the Times review lays out. Author Ralph Richard Banks dispels what the reviewer calls a popular perception that black women are too choosy. Where does that come from? Sitcoms and Hollywood, I suspect. The correct answer, of course is the economic reality of the marriageable mate dilemma: Black women significantly outperform black men in high school and college. As a result, the black middle class is disproportionately female and the black poor are disproportionately male, and the gap is widening. Extraordinary rates of incarceration for black men, and the ...


Fuggedaboutit, argues RiShawn Biddle in this Dropout Nation piece, which cites the USA Today commentary we wrote together: Meanwhile the Alexander plan fails to deal with the reality that accountability needs to be expanded, not scaled back. The need to force the overhaul of ed schools, who train most of the nation's new teachers, is still critical to the reform of American public education. Yet the Alexander plan is silent on that issue. Nor do Alexander's proposals address the crisis of low educational achievement among young men of all backgrounds, one of the leading symptoms of the education crisis. As ...


In Slate, Christina Sommers offers her take on Hanna Rosin's views. It's well written and worth a read, as is Rosin's piece. Men still rule the risk-taking and scientific endeavors that are so key our society, Sommers argues. True enough, but why are we letting so many of those males slip away? And why are we doing so little to encourage more females to take on those challenges? For ideological reasons, I can see why Sommers and Rosin can't be on the same side in the upcoming debate. But I still argue that the two "sides" are designed more to ...


Interesting piece in Time about worries in France about boys falling behind in school. Is it due to the disappearing male teacher? Like other western countries, France has seen an increasing feminization of education over the past 60 years. The rate of women teachers in primary schools went from 65% in 1954 to more than 82% nowadays. In private schools it peaked recently at 91%. In secondary education, the gap is still present, although less extreme. Like other western countries, France has seen an increasing feminization of education over the past 60 years. The rate of women teachers in primary ...


That's a question I come across often. Look around you, urge the leaders of the national feminist organizations. Men rule the White House, Congress and the Fortune 500. How bad can it be? To me, that fact of life had little to do with the relatively recent problem of boys lagging in school. But the question has to be answered, and Atlantic writer Hanna Rosin, author of 'The End of Men' and a panelist in the upcoming debate on this issue, answers the question in a Slate piece worth reading: Rosin: The question I always have to respond to is, ...


Given the plight of black males, this is appropriate. My caveat, as always, is that what ails black boys ails all boys, only to a greater degree. Therefore, when interventions are designed along racial lines, rather than gender lines, they are likely to fall short. For some reason, probably related to political correctness, it is perfectly acceptable to compare black boys to white boys, but unacceptable to compare black boys to black girls. And yet, at least half the formula to unlocking the problems we see among black males is found in the latter comparison. A smart argument (one that ...


At first I assumed Slate was running a spoof article but no, this is the real deal, a debate at NYU between some interesting parties, including Hanna Rosin, author of the Atlantic cover story 'The End of Men' and Christina Hoff Sommers, author of "The War Against Boys. Sign up here. From the Slate article: The debate proposition is "men are finished." What does that actually mean? A modern, post-industrial economy that seems better suited to women than men has led many experts to wonder if men are being permanently left behind. Education and employment statistics point to a clear ...


Once again, the emasculation of men is everywhere you look on fall TV, leaving some to speculate that this is a new theme -- or perhaps a theme generated by Hanna Rosin's influential Atlantic cover story, The End of Men, now coming your way as a book. Actually, Rosin's articles probably did spark some new emasculated men scripts, which she lists in her Atlantic blog. Even the kiddie shows are struggling over how to portray men, as the WSJ pointed out. And when a magazine tries to celebrate the "good man," it gets mocked. Truth is, this kind of portrayal ...


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