When it comes to schooling, the SAT (not counting football) is about the only standout for boys. It's an aptitude-heavy test, which means actual school learning counts less. As Mona Charen pleads (on behalf of her own sons and other boys): please, for the sake of the boys, keep the SAT. She has a point. Nobody has ever said boys are less bright than girls. Problem is, a good SAT score will get you only so far. As Maryland's Towson University learned in an experimental admissions program, admitting males with high SAT scores and poor grades doesn't really work. The ...


Here's a mystery gender gap: Women prefer iPhones; men Android. Prefer a gender neutral mobile device? Try the BlackBerry....


A grass roots approach in Lexington, Ky. (As always, I argue that the "boy troubles" should not be pigeonholed by race. The key to helping African American males is to identify the reasons nearly all boys are having problems. The solutions will end up helping black boys the most, because their problems are the most severe.) The five ingredients to seeing improvements, according to the speaker: ■ Teachers should identify the leaders of peer groups and push them to take on positive roles in school. ■ Parents need to be involved in the workings of the school and give support at home. ■ ...


In this Slate article, "The Cheating Cheaters of Moscow," the cheating phenomenon is explained, in part, by the "operational sex ratio." Put simply, when there's a shortage of one sex the opposite sex sets the rules. Doesn't matter if it's the animal or human kingdom. In Russia, the shortage of men is a major player in that country's attitudes about infidelity among men. The same holds true on college campuses in this country, where there's a shortage of men. And it's playing out on in the broader society as well, where there's a shortage of marriageable mates -- equally educated ...


If so, that could explain much of the pay gender gap. That controversial topic is explored at Time (brave souls there)....


Interesting story from Greenville confirms my anecdotal observations: single-gender classes benefit girls more than boys. As for academic improvements made in single-gender classrooms, I don't pay much attention to self-reported observations from students. This is a situation where real research is required. At the same time, however, I don't dismiss the importance of "satisfaction" surveys. Parents and students seek out choice in all forms, and single-gender classrooms is another avenue of choice. Before anyone gets too excited about parents flocking to single-gender offerings, however, consider this perspective from Anderson....


I was so busy complaining about the researchers leaving out gender data that I neglected to read the actual recommendations offered up for improving graduation rates. As John Merrow points out, recommendation #5 -- which happens to be where boys have fallen behind -- is key....


South Carolina is running the nation's biggest experiment in single-gender classes, and a recent survey confirms that those offerings are popular with parents. Here's the report. And here's the press release. And yet, the number of offerings has dropped from 214 to 125 over the past two years -- the result of slimmer school budgets, say educators there. Still, this raises the question I've raised before: what's the backup plan? Budget cuts aren't the only reason these program may disappear. Schools that only see satisfied parents -- but no academic gains -- will also be under pressure to cut the ...


Lots of buzz about the high school graduation report from America's Promise Alliance. And yet, once again we see a report that breaks out data by ethnicity but not gender. Considering the steep gender gaps in graduation rates, especially among African American and Latino students, these reports ignore a key part of any solution. For some reason, discussions of gender gaps in this country are considered controversial, and thereby need to be avoided. But as Chicago education researchers have discovered, what's playing out in schools is a "genderization of race." You can't solve race gaps without tackling gender gaps....


Originally I passed on this psych experiment out of the University of Colorado that claimed there was an easy way to boost the performance of female college students in courses such as physics and math. (As a reminder, I write about this on a boys blog because if women are going to dominate colleges we need a way to steer more women into economically critical majors). But Slate does an interesting analysis. Could it hurt to try?...


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