That comes from Yvette Jackson, head of the National Urban Alliance, guest columnist for the Post's Valerie Strauss. From the column: I wanted to cry when I read about the recent widely publicized report from the Council of Great City Schools about the underachievement of African-American males in our schools. Its findings bear repeating: African-American boys drop out at nearly twice the rate of white boys; their SAT scores are on average 104 points lower; and black men represented just 5 percent of college students in 2008. When I was the executive director of instruction and professional development for the ...


Thanks to Dan Willingham for spotting this one in ScienceDaily....


That's the Title 9 challenge from the National Women's Law Center. And here's the radio debate where a University of Chicago law professor challenges the merit of the suit. Thanks to Christina Hoff Sommers for spotting these....


Nice piece summing up developments in eschoolnews. My favorite part: American University's David Sadker still maintaining that schools favor boys. Wow, if the outcomes we're seeing "favor" boys try to imagine what academic life would look like for males if they weren't favored....


No, answers this British headmaster, who argues that a lack of male role models in schools causes boys to lose interest in academics. I think the problem goes well beyond a lack of male role models. Twenty five years ago, when boys were doing fine in school, elementary schools were just as dominated by female teachers as they are today....


Now that we have some state breakdowns on NAEP data, one blog reader was able to ask this question: "Would be interesting to know why Massachusetts has a (gender) gap of eleven points, while New Hampshire boasts eighteen. Where is NH going wrong?" I can't answer that question; but it's an interesting one. Massachusetts has the nation's most highly regarded standards-and-accountability system. That would be clue #1. Any accountability system that keeps boys from slipping behind is key....


To summarize briefly, boys 12 points behind girls in reading (but moving up a bit) and boys three points ahead of girls in math....


Made here in The Root. Frankly, I think these schools work more because they are high quality charters. As such, they provide badly needed escape hatches for urban families. But that's not the same as a broad solution to a huge problem. Single-sex education for girls draws plenty of advocates as well. Based on my anecdotal observations, these schools deliver more for girls than boys....


This will become a high profile experiment guaranteed to draw attention, not to mention legal challenges. Let's hope it draws some respectable research....


There are still multiple theories out there, most of which contain some truth. But the multiple theories serve as a barrier to action -- it just all seems so hopeless, especially if the causes are seen to be cultural. Some of the clear causes, however, are "actionable," such as the literacy issue, which I see as the biggest trigger. If educators could concentrate on just that one major thread we might see a turnaround of this gender slide. In the New York Post, Maggie Gallagher focuses on literacy. What worries me are the signals that top educators may be settling ...


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