A comparison of campus gender gaps done by the NYU newspaper. At urban universities such as NYU (60 percent female) the gaps have less impact than at universities located in rural areas or smaller cities where the social life is confined to the campus population....


Toronto's Globe & Mail wraps up its six-part series on the boy troubles with an editorial listing five steps that could help boys. This is the most impressive project newspaper project I've ever seen on the issue. If The New York Times or Wall Street Journal ever did the same in this country, policy would change. I'm only somewhat enthusiastic about the five they chose -- it's fair to say their list reflects the conventional wisdom about what's needed. But that's less important than the value of highlighting these issues for educators, who tend to ignore gender gaps....


That's the discussion at Canada's McMaster University after realizing that 77 percent of the medical school admits were women. Why the imbalance? Because the admissions standards are based on grade point averages and women earn better grades. This is part of the excellent Globe & Mail series on the gender gaps....


Why, asks commentary writer Richard Vedder in the Chronicle of Higher Education, are 17 million Americans with four-year degrees working in jobs that don't require those degrees? Isn't that a waste of an education? Isn't that proof that far too many people go to college? This is an important issue in the boys debate. Why worry so much about the college gender gaps if those men don't really need college anyway? My answer: because college is the new high schools. Employers have lots of hiring options. To many, only applicants with two or four-year-degree have the demonstrated people skills desired ...


That goal, to boost the United States to the top of world rankings for college completion, won't happen, and today's report from the American Council on Education makes it clear why: men are not completing college at the same rate as women. The Post's version. If Obama and the national foundations dedicated to boosting college attainment rates want to make progress toward the 2020 goal they can start by knocking down the de facto moratorium they maintain on acknowledging the gender gaps. The DOE has not issued a single study on the gender gaps. And it's possible to read through ...


Thanks to Jon Wolfer for sending me this Harvard Education Letter piece on what's playing out ... so to speak ... in kindergarten these days....


From the Guardian. That's roughly what you'd find in this country....


The Canadians, whose gender gaps mirror those in the U.S., seem all over the topic. This from Maclean's....


Okay, a quick qualification: it was to a Canadian reporter, part of the Globe and Mail mega-project now playing out. Definitely worth a read. Is it possible no U.S. reporter has ever asked him about the gender gaps? In Chicago, Duncan was surrounded by good research on the issue from the Consortium on Chicago School Research (that's where the term "genderization of race" first appeared). The college prep high schools there are desperately short on guys. The boys troubles are hard to miss. This Canadian interview is important stuff. I've never heard Duncan opine on the issue. His preferred ...


There's more interest in the gender gaps in Canada (and England, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere) than you find in the United States, despite the fact the gaps are roughly the same. I can't explain why. My only theory is that when the "boy troubles" first surfaced in this country they were seen as a right-wing assault on the gains made by feminists. (The highly influential book, "The War on Boys," by Christina Hoff Sommers blamed feminists for the gender gaps. Consider the book's subtitle: "How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Men"). As such, the gender gaps were dismissed ...


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