If you're only educating half the county, how can you push up our competitive index? Good question asked in this commentary. The (correct) answer offered in the piece for why districts get away with only doing a good job educating girls: they aren't asked (by law) to pay attention to gender. The problem with that answer: if you don't pay attention to gender you won't solve the challenges you're required by law to address, race and income....


Another single-sex experiment, this time in Maine....


That's what they say the Good Men Project Magazine is all about....


Yes, you need them (including the men who aren't getting them). More than you think, argues Kevin Carey in the Chronicle. (password may be needed)...


That's the conclusion of this Berkeley study. That's not surprising. On state tests boys and girls score roughly the same. Actually, the overall trend is that girls are pushing ahead of boys. This study is important, however, because it cuts into the dangerous mythology that boys are good at math, girls are good at reading, and nobody should worry if boys are far behind in literacy skills. These days ... it matters....


That's Houghton Mifflin's take, as the company introduces an intervention designed to boost the interest of boys in reading....


One in six British boys can't write their name by the age of five. Pushing a formal reading curriculum on boys too early -- a theme that will sound familiar to readers of this blog -- gets the blame....


Good piece in the Philly Inquirer, but the reporter settles too easily into the theory that the gender gaps are driven only by minority men. Is that the case at the University of Delaware? I suspect there's more to it. Reporters given this many inches might also want to spend a graph or two exploring what all this means beyond college. (thanks to Chuck Meissner for spotting this one)...


Women may be earning more six-figure salaries, but the gaps among women -- generated by education differences -- are stark....


Interesting ... I can't imagine seeing this in the United States, despite the fact our gender gaps are just as steep. Some countries, including England and Australia, are far ahead of the U.S. in dealing with the issue. To date, the U.S. Department of Education has never even acknowledged the problem exists....


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