The book has a slightly changed cover and a new introduction, which leads off: At first glance, it might appear that the "boy troubles" are on their way to being solved. Much has changed since the original publication of Why Boys Fail nearly two years ago, and many of those changes appear positive. Two years ago, the suggestion that boys were in trouble and falling behind in school was hotly debated, with national feminist groups denying boys were in trouble. After the book was published I debated doubters at the National Press Club, at a panel at the American Enterprise ...


(This piece is also running today in The Dallas Morning News; link requires registration) ............... Richard Whitmire: What's behind education's 'boy problems'? Oregon recently announced that 6,800 high school seniors were at risk of being denied diplomas because they were unable to pass the state reading test. Here's a fact that wasn't included in the news: 3,900 of those students are males, 2,900 females. An oddity? Probably not, given that boys continue to fall behind girls in reading, according to a 50-state survey released earlier this year by the Center on Education Policy. These academic gender gaps are ...


You'll see it in President Obama's upcoming speech about proposals for creating jobs. The White House is all too aware of the growing political disaffection of working-class white males. Absent job creation, Obama has little hope of winning that group. Why? Because of social and economic trends that are mostly beyond the power of the White House to shape. Washington Post columnist Harold Meyerson captured the dilemma in his Sunday column: We are only now beginning to understand the toll this economy has taken on America's workers -- and on our working men in particular. A stunning study from Michael ...


This is a fascinating issue, and one that can be seen mostly clearly in the U.K., where they collect data on that subgroup. In this country, the accountability system is geared more for minorities and poverty. Again, we have the national test in the U.K., the GCSE, as a data guide. In this story in the Telegraph, a British think tanker takes apart the numbers: At the very bottom of the pile are poor white boys, a result that some people might find surprising. That's partly because we are looking at GCSE results here. At the start of ...


In this article in the Telegraph, the reporter suggests a reason behind the widening gender gaps recently revealed in national testing in the U.K.: a paucity of male teachers in primary schools: Data from the General Teaching Council for England shows that some 27 per cent of primaries - 4,569 - are staffed entirely by women. Men make up just one-in-eight teachers working in primary schools and only 48 are currently employed in state-run nurseries. The disclosure comes amid concerns that a lack of positive male role models may be putting boys off school at a young age ...


Interesting profile of a new boys school in Calgary. I especially like the description of the library: Principal Garry Jones, himself a father of two boys, has already spent much of August inside the school, preparing classrooms and building a unique, boy friendly library. Teachers and kids will choose from a good selection of nonfiction reading, with themes that include bugs, snakes, trucks and dinosaurs, along with plenty of action and adventure novels. Graphic novels, which tell stories with large, animated pictures similar to comic strips, will also fill shelves. Jones says he's taken up the challenge of meeting boys' ...


That's the conclusion of Syracuse professor Boyce Watkins, writing in NewsOne for Black America. Watkins cites the example of the white Patterson, N.J., teacher who was fired for posting this on Facebook: "I am not a teacher. I am a warden for future criminals.? The teacher, Jennifer O'Brien, later explained: "I was speaking out of frustration to their behavior, just that build up of 'I don't know what else to do,' and I'm actually scared for their futures, for some of them," O'Brien said. "If you're hitting your teacher at 6 or 7 years old, that's not a ...


That's the conclusion of this study which looks at "spacial abilities," the ability to mentally rotate objects -- a talent connected to engineering prowess. This article suggests that this is the issue that got former Harvard President Lawrence Summers in so much trouble when he speculated about the thin talent pool of female scientists. Actually, what got Summers in trouble was repeating the genius/dummy observation that testing experts agree is a fact: Men tend to fall disproportionately into the very top and very bottom of pretty much any test cohort. More geniuses, more dummies. For a new take on ...


Interesting Lisa Belkin essay in the Times about women dominating campuses academically while acting socially submissive. She focuses on Princeton, however, which like many of the Ivies has a 50-50 gender mix. When campuses go beyond 60-40 is when the gender imbalances drives the social/sexual norm in unhealthy directions. Update: A rebuttal in Slate....


That's the conclusion of a new book, The Truth About Girls and Boys, written by 'boy troubles' skeptics Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett. Title sound familiar? They just reversed the "boys and girls" in Sara Mead's famous Education Sector piece. Can't help but wonder how Mead feels about that. (I later contacted Mead, who was unaware of the book and said she didn't care about the title similarities.) A Q&A with Barnett, where she maintains that gender differences are negligible and the push for single-sex schooling unwarranted. I have my own doubts about single-sex schooling as a solution, but ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here