Women are now beating the men in Navy awards....


The New York Times runs a piece on the College Board report on the U.S. slipping in world education rankings and neglects to mention the biggest player -- men. If the United States were to correct its gender imbalance, with 62 percent of the associate's degrees (the usual measure of international rankings) going to women, the country could regain its top rankings. True, other countries such as Canada also have steep gender imbalances, but if you're looking for a tactic to get quick gains, look to boosting college enrollment and graduation rates among males....


...as in, what's actually happening on the ground, where parents showing up for graduation/honors ceremonies can't help but notice: what happened to the boys? This column from New Jersey adds to the collection....


The End of Men? Not quite, concludes the New York Times columnist today, who nicely cites Why Boys Fail. From the column: My hunch is that we're moving into greater gender balance, not a fundamentally new imbalance in the other direction. Don't hold your breath for "the end of men." One reason is that women's gains still have a catch-up quality to them. Catch-up is easier than forging ahead. Moreover, the differences in educational performance are real but modest. In math, boys and girls are about equal. In verbal skills, 79 percent of elementary schoolgirls can read at a level ...


Possibly, as discussed in this Associated Press article exploring the kind of reading material that appeals to boys and might help close the gender reading gaps. I usually cite the Captain Underpants series of books as an example of what boys like but teachers spurn. Hey, I've even open to using comic books...er, make that graphic novels....


This time in Arkansas. At least from an anecdotal reading of these experiments (there's no research I'm aware of) the best use of single-sex schools (that make use of boy-brain theories and draw male teachers) is in urban areas....


Here's how they handle the dilemma Illinois style....


Actually, nobody knows for sure because the research is so poor and you can't really compare private schools to the public experiments now taking place. But to date, single-sex schools have emerged as the only "solution" to the gender gaps. Here's the debate in Pittsburgh. I have to credit Leonard Sax for being realistic about the single-sex option....


As I've written before, including in this USA commentary, the gender gaps few notice involve white boys from working class families. Today, a New York Times columnist writes about why few of these students end up in selective colleges. While the piece doesn't break out numbers out by gender, I know from other indicators that the gender gaps within this group are steep....


That's the headline atop an interesting New York Times discussion about why women are more hesitant than men in taking risks in business and technology -- an important topic considering the gender imbalances on campuses. With no leveling of those graduation gaps forecast in the near, or even distant, future, it's important to steer more women into strategically important fields. I take issue with the observation that girls begin to fade in STEM courses in middle school. My reading of the Advanced Placement data indicates that high schools are doing great job educating young women in the sciences. It's what ...


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