That's explored in this Independent commentary, which considers both Hanna Rosin's Atlantic cover story and the recent revelations about gender gaps in England among college graduates....


Vietnam joins the experiment....


I'm not fond of video games and recognize the harm they can cause. But I'm skeptical that video games play the villain role in the boy troubles. Interesting discussion of that in England where there's fresh debate on the gender gaps resulting from surveys showing that male college graduates aren't faring as well as their female counterparts. And, to add to the discussion, we have the always insightful Dan Willingham writing in the Post about whether technology has shaped the way we learn....


Hadn't run across this one before -- among university graduates there are gender lines regarding who's getting work, with the lazier males falling behind the women. Still, when men land work their pay is higher....


The argument from feminists is that we shouldn't worry about underachieving boys when the world's elite, especially the risk taking entrepreneurs, are nearly all men. On one level, they're right. Those are the very top, from mathematicians to capitalists, are almost uniformly male. Was Larry Summers right? To me, there are two issues here. The first: why are men more likely to pursue STEM careers and take entrepreneurial risks? Seems like we have to encourage more well educated women to do the same. This Washington Post op-ed gets at that. The gender gap issues I write about, by contrast, involve ...


I remain baffled by the persistent argument that college isn't that necessary -- an argument always made by someone who made sure his sons graduated from a superb college. This New York Times article lays it out: here's the current state of manufacturing jobs that are available....


A sample from her article in The American, a publication of the American Enterprise Institute: Pre-kindergarten boys with mental abilities three or four standard deviations above the mean have astonishing talents. But as Terry Neu, an expert on gifted boys, told me, sitting still for an extended period of time is not one of them. The capacity to remain seated for a long test does not reliably measure brilliance, but requiring pre-K children to do it is a sure way of securing more places for girls than boys in a gifted program....


Good piece in Newsweek on boosting the number of women pursuing STEM studies and careers -- a goal that rises in importance as women continue to dominate colleges and universities. The debate about this is fascinating, and I don't pretend to have any solutions. After following this issue for several years, however, I remain wary of any legislative solutions. That's why the lede anecdote bothers me: I just don't buy into the argument from feminists that a massive conspiracy led by sexist STEM professors is at fault. That aside, the need for action is clear, and I agree with this ...


Michael Sadowski reviews the literature on the reading gaps and offers some guidance on boosting the reading abilities of boys. He also brings up something I should have included in the book, the 'Matthew Effect.' Most researchers agree that on average, boys develop the skills associated with reading and writing 12 to 24 months later than girls. Attending to the possible difficulties some boys (and girls) may have with reading early on is crucial, Snow says, to avoid what psychologist Keith Stanovich has called the "Matthew Effect," in which strong readers move further and further ahead, while early deficits ...


Any discussion of why college gender gaps matter, or don't matter, has to include two considerations: the low percentages of women in some hard sciences and the paucity of women emerging as business risk takers. Both those considerations make a difference in this country's economic competitiveness. Business Week takes a cut at the entrepreneurial question. Only seven percent of the business startups drawing venture capital are started by women....


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