This time in Prince William County outside Washington. Wouldn't it be nice if these schools had some national research to guide them? But no, they are forced to find their own way....


John Tierney has a good column in the Times that summarizes the research behind the math/science gender gap. Actually, I need to be careful about generalizing about those gaps. Women make up more than half of the biological sciences majors. And from the PBS Nova show, we have these two female scientists taking a different tack. I think Tierney is right to say there's no legislative solution to the gaps. And if these mandatory workshops do arise you can bet we'll see more silliness such as Gender Bias Bingo. My question last time the game arose: If I stand ...


Life is just unfair that way. Here's HIrsch and Robert Pondiscio in The American Prospect, explaining in one succinct essay why Reading First failed. They are too polite to point that out -- but I will. They don't reference the boys issue, but they don't have to. Reading First was designed for high poverty schools where boys were far behind in literacy skills. It was supposed to rescue them, but didn't....


Charlotte Allen in the Washington Times writing about the investigation into college admissions preferences. I wish I shared her assumption that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is out to discover the actual facts. I still don't understand why the commission didn't select the College of William & Mary. Here's a public university where the director of admissions has openly embraced gender preferences..."We're not called the College of Mary and Mary," he once said. And yet it didn't make the list, in spite of being in the same geographic range of the others on the list....


That's the argument of some who say there's no need to worry about the gender mismatches on college campuses. Not true, according to this report from Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. Look at the shift in B.A.-required jobs from 1973 to 2018, a rise from 9 percent to 23 percent....


Rosalind C. Barnett and Caryl Rivers, the chief architects for the "pushback movement," those saying boys are doing just fine in school, take on the New York City gifted gap, citing evidence that boys are more likely than girls to be privately tested for gifted programs. I don't have to hold a professorship to know the answer to that one. Just being a parent with two kids who attended academically competitive public schools is sufficient. You have your kids privately tested because they weren't accepted for the gifted program by the test administered by the school district. And guess who's ...


The postponement of adulthood for women comes off as logical in this article. For the guys, maybe not so much. Maybe it's logical, or maybe it's just failure to launch. From the article: More people in their 20s are also living with their parents. About one-fourth of 25-year-old white men lived at home in 2007 -- before the latest recession -- compared with one-fifth in 2000 and less than one-eighth in 1970....


I'll believe that we no longer have to worry about women avoiding tech careers when I see those Silicon Valley cubicles for code writers stuffed with women. Still, this article about female web entrepreneurs is hopeful....


Not only are little girls dominating the gifted classes in New York City, but grownup girls are dominating the valedictorian rosters. Could one thing be leading to another? Naaaah...probably just a coincidence....


Education Week's Diploma Count report adds up the most current figures: two-thirds of boys graduate from high school -- a rate that's 7 points lower than the female rate....


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