Want an example of how more intense reading and writing standards have been pushed into the lower grades, affecting boys more than girls? Here's an Education Week essay by writing expert Thomas Newkirk, author of Misreading Masculinity, a must-read for anyone studying the gender gap. The new common core writing standard for second graders, quoted in his commentary: "Write informative and explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, present similar information together using headers to signal groupings when appropriate, and provide a concluding sentence or section." Comments Newkirk: While a few students ...


I continue to like the research that comes out of the U.K. on this issue....


In The End of Men, Hanna Rosin lays out the international case for why parents, societies and businesses are favoring women. Simply put, in a postindustrial society women make a better fit. When parents practice sex selection, they chose girls, not boys. Given yesterday's primary news, where women are beginning to take their proper place in politics, Rosin's piece is timely. From the article: We've all heard about the collegiate gender gap. But the implications of that gap have not yet been fully digested. Women now earn 60 percent of master's degrees, about half of all law and medical degrees, ...


A reminder of this resource for anyone interested in a broad look at boys' issues, including health issues....


This Hechinger report about the diminished expectations for the children of the Great Recession does a good job laying out trends ranging from education attainment to job possibilities. But there's no mention of the obvious: males are especially impacted. With nearly 80 percent of the layoffs involving men, and projections that men will fall even farther behind in education -- with the percentage of female enrollment in four-year colleges rising to 59 percent -- this seems like an issue worth covering. But these reports rarely take on that controversial topic. That's unfortunate, because we're all going to be affected, starting ...


SEDL, the nonprofit education think tank, offers logical suggestions for steering more females into math and science. Notice the absence of any conspiracy theories about why females have avoided those fields....


The New York Times columnist is right about what Larry Summers actually said, and he's right to be skeptical about assuming feminists are right when they suggest a conspiracy theory explains why so few women pursue STEM majors and (persist with) STEM careers. It would be nice if a simple villain were behind the fact that only about 20 percent of the STEM majors are women. Unfortunately, it's a bit more complicated. This is a fight I prefer to duck. It's relevant to the boys issue only because if women are to dominate universities we have a national economic interest ...


Writing in New York Magazine, Rosin looks at the gender gaps in light of the recent New York Times piece on girls dominating the early-grades gifted classes in New York City. The answer seems clear: When you push more intensive verbal skills to the early grades, where girls can handle them better than boys, and then measure for "giftedness" using a test heavy on verbal skills .... I mean, should anyone be surprised?...


Good suggestions from Slate, ranging from "The Lightning Thief" to "Diary of a Wimpy Kid."...


Teachers here doing their best to level the gender reading gap. True, boys have always tested behind girls in reading. But in previous generations that mattered less. Today, college has become the new high school, and in college literacy skills are survival skills, regardless of your major....


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