University of Kansas researcher documents the impact of the Great Recession on men who lost their breadwinner identify. As researcher Tom Mortenson told me once, men work. It's what we do. And we're lost when we lose that role. From the press release: The acute economic downturn that began in 2008 sometimes is called the "mancession" to reflect its harsher impact on men than women. As recently as last November, 10.4 percent of adult men were unemployed as compared to 8 percent of adult women. But how do unemployed men cope with their shifting domestic roles, especially when they ...


British survey from the National Literacy Trust....


In this study, football comes off as the heavy. I'm no defender of college football programs, but this study seems a bit sketchy to me. This line in the Chronicle summarizes it nicely: "This study clearly has it limitations." Oh yeah....


And it comes from someone who knows something about the subject. From the essay by author Robert Lipsyte: To me and I think to many prospective readers, today's books for boys -- supernatural space-and-sword epics that read like video game manuals and sports novels with preachy moral messages -- often seem like cynical appeals to the lowest common denominator. Boys prefer video games and ESPN to book versions of them. These knockoffs also lack the tough, edgy story lines that allow boys a private place to reflect on the inner fears of failure and humiliation they try so hard to ...


It always worries me when the motive stated by parents, as heard in Tampa, is they simply want the sexes separated. But happens when there are no academic gains? The 'distractions' motive is also cited in Houston....


The Economist does a great job sorting through the rapid changes in marriage patterns in Asian countries. Most of the changes are triggered by education trends....


This is what so many males need -- skills that need some post-secondary work, but not necessarily a four-year degree. And yet, too many males aren't getting that message. Sorry about the truncated wsj link. Normally, I wouldn't link this article, but it's an important topic, so even three graphs for those not paying 'dues' to the wsj are still important....


Would be great if it worked....


Appreciate the nod. She knows something about the topic: she wrote the foreword....


Brain researcher Lise Eliot, author of Pink Brain, Blue Brain, takes on the single-sex science. From the piece: Although there is no doubt that boys and girls have different interests which shape how they respond to different academic subjects, neuroscientists have had great difficulty identifying meaningful differences between boys' and girls' neural processing - even for learning to read, which has been the most studied to date. And although research shows that men and women - not boys and girls - tend towards different self-professed learning styles, there is no evidence that teaching specifically geared to such differences is actually ...


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