I've never defended video games as good for boys. The question I continue to ask, however, is which came first, the dislike of school or the embrace of video games?...


That's the argument made here....


Interesting discussion in the Atlanta papers....


All that needs to happen, for Jack Jennings to get what he asks for, is for the same efforts to be made to boost boys' literacy that were made for girls regarding math and science. Seems simple enough. There's no evidence boys were hurt as more girls were steered into upper level math and science courses. Try explaining that to the AAUW, which still maintains the boy troubles are a mirage -- nothing more than repackaged race and income issues....


...when a Boys Inc. is formed. When I google "Boys Inc" I get stories about boys incontinence. I get the impression Girls Inc. is something more than that. The press release: CIVIL RIGHTS ASSISTANT SECRETARY TO ADDRESS GIRLS INC. 2010 NATIONAL CONFERENCE Russlynn Ali, assistant secretary for the Office for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education, will address the Girls Inc. 2010 National Conference's Promise Plenary session today at the Washington Marriott Hotel in downtown Washington. Girls Inc. is a national organization committed to empowering girls to succeed and using its mission to lead the way in ...


....and how to halt it for African American boys, in this journal article....


There are plenty of studies about the black gender gaps, but not that many efforts to do something about them that appear to be paying dividends. That's what makes the Call Me Mister program so important. The program is based at Clemson University and run by Roy Jones, who oversees a statewide recruitment program where young black men are given tuition help in exchange for a commitment to teach. On Saturday I had an opportunity to speak before the group and met nearly 200 young men who are either in college or currently teaching. Impressive, and worth imitating in other ...


The personal side to the black gender gap story, in Dropout Nation....


The Economist does a great job laying out the dilemma facing black women generated by incarceration rates, but oddly never considers the education angle. For middle class black women, that's a bigger driver. In cities such as Washington, college educated black women outnumber similarly educated black men by three to one....


Here's the news from the Washington leg of a multi-city experiment....


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