Yesterday, after his column on boys was published in The New York Times, Nicholas Kristof opened up his blog on the issue, explaining why he decided to write about boys. He also invited comments from readers....


The most valuable discussion about gender gaps continues to arise from Australia. Here's a discussion from the Sydney Morning Herald that includes some valuable research links. Also interesting is the debate about single-sex education. Based on nothing more than anecdotal hunch, I've long suspected that single-sex education benefits girls more than boys. I find I'm not alone. Interesting irony at play here: single-sex education, to date, is the only "solution" to the boy troubles being offered by educators....


In the Chronicle, a former Education Department official takes issue with the recent AAUW report about the shortage of women in math and science majors and careers....


Using my book and the recent Center on Education Policy report as springboards, The New York Times columnist takes a look at the boy troubles and settles on the literacy issue as the major trigger. What strikes me is the range of responses I've gotten from the book. Fox & Friends wanted to talk about it, as did Kristof, who is better known for championing girls worldwide. George Stephanopoulos wanted me on Good Morning America; Michael Medved wanted me on his radio show. All this means that Education Secretary Arne Duncan has the political cover to engage this controversial issue and ...


...is found in South Carolina. This newsletter from David Chadwell is one-stop shopping on the issue....


ABDO interviews me about the reading (and non-reading) habits of boys....


The New York tabloid takes on the marriageable mate dilemma....


National experts lay out their worries -- the world has become more literacy focused and U.S. students, especially boys, aren't keeping up. Here's an example of a Connecticut reporter examining the numbers in that state. The key gender figure: In eighth grade, 48 percent of girls in Connecticut met the proficiency standard, compared with 37 percent of boys....


What makes them succeed? That's the topic of this study from MDRC....


Bottom line: No gender gap changes worth noting. Which means a continuation of the status quo -- more girls than boys succeeding in this verbal-intensive world, where even math problems are expressed as word problems....


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