Glad to see the attention on black boys; they truly have troubles. But barely more troubles than Hispanic boys. White boys from blue-collar families aren't far behind. I'd love to see a PBS special on what all these boys have in common. I've never thought focusing just on African-American boys was the most effective strategy....


Then why aren't they going at the same rates? The time when women needed college more than men has passed. Check out the ACT results, especially in states such as Colorado and Illinois, where all students must take the exam (thereby giving a fair, direct comparison). I've run into this with the ACT before. The literacy gender gaps favoring girls that are so striking on state tests show up on the ACT as moderate. The math gaps that on state tests show up as near-negligible (in many states girls are tied or slightly ahead) appear on the ACT as strongly ...


Pretty obvious, right? Still, there's some interesting context in this Pew survey. This from the Chronicle story: The public seems to be undecided about the impact of changes in the gender makeup of the student body. A majority of people surveyed welcomed the fact that more women than men were graduating from college. But when asked if it was a good or a bad thing that fewer men were graduating from college than women, their reactions switched: 46 percent of respondents said it was a bad thing that fewer men than women were attaining college degrees. Racial and ethnic patterns ...


Education Week hosting a session on improving academic outcomes for African American boys. Check it out......


Dallas pilots an all-boys school....


The New York Times did a great job reporting this. Look at the trend data they have for men and women with only a high school diploma: The increase in unmarried couples cohabitating and having children swept poor communities beginning in the late 1960s, Mr. Wilcox said, citing data from the National Survey of Family Growth, and now has moved into working class and lower-middle-class families. Out-of-wedlock births among white women with a high school diploma rose more than sixfold in recent decades, the report said, jumping to 34 percent in the late 2000s, from 5 percent in 1982. In ...


New report from the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia. Given the unique impacts fatherless families have on boys, the results are worth reviewing. Some of the points: * Divorces involving children have largely returned to pre-"divorce revolution" levels. Specifically, about 23 percent of children whose parents married in the early 1960s divorced by the time the children turned 10. More recently, slightly more than 23 percent of children whose parents married in 1997 divorced by the time the kids turned 10, down from a high of more than 27 percent in the mid-1970s. * Family instability for U.S....


Here's an angle that never occurred to me, served up by Inside HIgher Education....


Courtesy of Edweek....


Jamaica finds a home for boys no longer wanted at their regular schools....


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