Center for American Progress releases a report on the policy changes needed by the surge in the numbers of working women. Today, women make up half the workforce. In two thirds of all families, women are either the primary or co-breadwinners. Traditional families, those with the man as the only breadwinner, make up only a fifth of all families, the authors explained in a call to reporters yesterday. Those changes, they argue in the report, bring about the need for increased family and medical leave protections, support for elder-care and workplace flexibility provisions....


At Urban Prep, every senior in the school's first graduating class has been accepted into a four-year college. Although the magnitude of the success can't be judged absent a profile of the entering students, the article points to two striking facts: The school is only two years old and only four percent of the entering students read at grade level. The most successful school I saw during my book research was Excellence Boys Charter School in New York. Those students are several years away from applying for college, but I predict similar outcomes there. My question: Can elite charters in ...


The push to reinvigorate the DOE's Office of Civil Rights raises the question of whether DOE will update the traditional and somewhat dated boundaries of civil rights probes. True, minority students continue to emerge from K-12 schools far less prepared for college work than white students. But black and Latino women, compared to the men, are doing comparatively well. Will that gender disparity draw scrutiny? At the college level, women at many private four-year-colleges face higher admissions hurdles to gain admittance, the result of colleges reaching deeper into their applicant pools to find male students. That's discrimination. Will that get ...


Dur to the recession the number of men applying to be primary school teachers has soared by 50 percent, reports the Mail. If this is happening here, I haven't seen it reported....


In the schools I profile that are successful with boys, a common element of instruction is ensuring that math and science classes emphasize literacy skills. With that in mind I offer up this release from the International Reading Association: IRA Reading Radio Program Spotlights Presidential Award-Winning Teacher It's never too early to help young students learn to link literacy skills to content areas such as science. This month's installment of the International Reading Association's Reading Radio program features Jo Anne Deshon, an elementary teacher from Newark, Delaware, addressing "The Critical Link Between Literacy 2.0 and Excellence in Science." In ...


I could see conservatives re-embracing this issue as a political issue. Frankly, I'm surprised it hasn't popped up among the Tea Party set. Here's an Obama budget analysis along gender fault lines, as seen by conservatives....


In this letter to Edweek AAUW executive director Linda Hallman takes issue with this recent posting I wrote, claiming I'm promoting "gender wars." Actually, you won't see "gender wars" in any of my writing. There's no war -- just the reality of boys lagging in school at a time when men and women have equal needs for post-high school degrees. And yet here are the numbers: 62 percent of associate's degrees and 57 percent of bachelor's degrees go to women. This issue has little to do with women; these are failings by educators whose job it is to prepare and ...


Will tops his screed against blue jeans with this one about immature girly boys. When reading the last half of this column, I think it helps to hum: Gee, Officer Krupke, we're very upset; We never had the love that ev'ry child oughta get. We ain't no delinquents, We're misunderstood. Deep down inside us there is good! I mean, we all know the world would be a better place if everyone donned a bow tie and voted Republican. No argument there....


Many of us, including me, hoped out loud that President Obama would use his position to tackle the school gender gaps -- at the very least, the steep gender gaps revealed among African American boys. As his recent speech on dropout prevention reveals, however, that's unlikely to happen. Here was an opportunity to point out that 32 percent of males drop out of high school, compared to 25 percent of females. He could have mentioned that 52 percent of black males drop out, compared to 39 percent of black females. Obama could have mentioned that men who enter college are ...


After four years of studying the boys problem I still haven't reached a conclusion on the impact new technologies have on literacy. Conventional wisdom suggests the influence is negative. I'm undecided, but I did note this press release from the International Reading Association: New IRA book provides strategies for "remixing" best practices and new literacies NEWARK, DELAWARE, USA--To be literate in today's society full of Tweeting, blogging, YouTubing, texting, and downloading means constantly developing new literacy skills. But how can a middle or high school classroom teacher--who may not be as up-to-speed with new technologies as her 13-year-old students--connect the ...


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