This article from Beaver Dam, Wis., (love the name) is typical of what I see in news coverage: We like what we see from our single-sex experiment...no improvement in test scores, but we like what we see. What does that mean? This is why the federal Department of Education needs to step in to evaluate the grand experiment it launched three years ago. Is this really working, and if so, what makes it work?...


Interesting idea from Copenhagen....


Girls, by contrast, choose far more sophisticated literature, according to this British study of reading habits. In Britain, Australia and other countries, educators are trying to solve the literacy gender issue. This study pinpoints the ages 13-16 as the time when the gaps are most pronounced. In the United States, the reading gender gaps are just as wide, but the issue is ignored. And then college admissions officers scratch their heads and wonder where all the boys have gone....


Dating Out is what black women call dating someone out of their race, as laid out in this Washington Post article. For black women looking to marry someone equally educated, that's an option that has to be considered. In urban areas such as Washington, there are three times as many college educated black women as men. The math is simple. The math is also becoming simple for white women. With 62 percent of associate's degrees and 57 percent of bachelor's degrees going to women, where are educated white women going to find suitable mates? By "marrying down," so to speak, ...


Feminists have opposed single-sex education from the beginning. Here's a taste of their legal arguments surrounding the ongoing lawsuit in Louisiana. My favorite phony argument is pointing to the federal survey of all single-sex programs, which concluded that on average they work no better than coed classes. That's like the federal survey of charter schools the unions always embraced that showed the same -- on average, they work no better than traditional schools. True, but what about the roughly 300 elite charters, ranging from Uncommon Schools to KIPP, that daily hit home runs for inner city kids who never had ...


The President has a set a goal of having the world's most educated workforce by 2020, as measured by OECD standards of those holding at least a two-year degree. The recession, however, is cutting into progress toward that goal. But, there's another way to meet that goal: Focus on the population that's causing our poor showing on that education standard -- men. Currently, 62 percent of those earning associate degrees are men. Wouldn't it make sense to place efforts there? That won't happen, however, unless Obama decides to take on some women's advocacy groups that won't want to see attention ...


UC San Diego is doing what more colleges and universities should be doing to boost the numbers of women going into math and science fields. Having universities mostly populated by women -- with only 20 percent of some STEM majors female -- is unacceptable, from a national economic perspective....


This commentary I wrote for USA Today about a new theme emerging in country songs -- that educated ladies can't resist country boys -- may suggest to some that I'm hostile to country music. Not at all. I know about these videos because CMT is what I watch when I'm on the elliptical. But there's something going on with the sons of white working class families that's not encouraging -- and mostly hidden, the result of school accountability systems that ignore them....


This University of Texas program designed to lure more middle school girls into pursuing STEM subjects sounds great. It's exactly what needs to be done, especially if college gender balances favoring women continue into the future. We need far more women sticking with science/math majors and entering those careers. So why is it so hard for schools to realize they need to do something comparable for boys in literacy skills? The world has gotten more verbal; boys haven't. That's the core of the "boy troubles," and yet other than single sex education schools seem reluctant to craft interventions to ...


I say they do. Like it not, college is the new high school. Nearly all decent-paying jobs require some study after high school. And yet there are many out there who disagree, making the argument: Do we really need more degreed hamburger flippers? This National Review writer takes exception to the recent piece I wrote for The Chronicle of Higher Education and argues that Obama is wrong to set higher college attainment as a goal....


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