The Washington Post today has a good feature today on how the "man-cession" is affecting families, leaving fewer women with the option of staying home and making more women the sole breadwinners. What the story doesn't get at is the factor that will give this trend legs into the future -- the unbalanced gender education story. Put simply, women are becoming far more employable regardless of economic conditions....


Gawker serves as the vehicle for the complaints from some of the students quoted in the Times story about the dating dilemma on campuses where the female population reaches 60 percent. I blogged on that and linked my reporting on the situation, based on a visit to Virginia's James Madison University. This is tricky reporting territory. Recently, I wrote a commentary on the "marriageable mate" issue for The Wall Street Journal and the woman I profiled reported getting some horrible comments posted about her. As for the Times piece, if anything I thought it was mild. Something really unhealthy is ...


While researching my book I spent a couple of days at California State University in Fullerton, in the exurbs of Los Angeles. This huge university, which draws mostly commuter students from families with little college-going experience, serves as a bellwether -- reflecting the racial and ethnic mix of the future. On graduation day at Cal State campuses -- the biggest university system in the country with 450,000 students -- there are two women for every man. And Fullerton is no exception. What was especially interesting to me was the vastly better graduation rate of the women there. Not only ...


Kathleen Parker has a great column in today's Washington Post about when men feel most purposeful. It reminds me of my conversations with Tom Mortenson, the guru of the gender gap issue. Mortenson has a stark view of men. Their purpose in life is simple: Work. Grunt work, is okay. Any kind of work. Take work away from men, and they're lost. Parker, author of Save the Males, reminds us of the stressful days ahead as less-educated males try to cope with an economy turning against them....


This Q&A with me appears in today's paper....


This commentary I wrote for today's Chronicle of Higher Education fleshes out a little-known offshoot of the boy troubles found in many high-poverty high schools -- the ninth grade "bulge." That's where boys passed along in the early grades (regardless of how well they absorbed the material) run smack into ninth grade, the first year of a college-prep curriculum. They're not ready and are therefore told to repeat ninth grade. Thus, the ninth grade bulge, where boys greatly outnumber girls. No one should be surprised that many don't make it beyond ninth grade, which explains why in many school districts ...


The marriageable mate dilemma is likely to be the enduring impact of educational inequities. It's a simple math problem: 62 percent of those earning associate's degrees and 57 percent of those receiving bachelor's degrees are female. If women are looking for an equally educated mate, some are going to come up short. In today's Washington Post Lori Gottlieb tackles the question once again: Here comes another Valentine's Day, and oh, how I wish I could spend it with a husband. Not an Adonis with the humor of Jon Stewart and the bank account of Bill Gates; just a good-enough guy. ...


When campuses approach 60 percent female, the dating scene gets out of kilter, and not in a healthy way. In this Styles piece, the Times puts a cute face on it. But as described in this Chronicle of Higher Education piece in 2008, written after visiting James Madison University, there's nothing cute about it. Avoiding this situation is why colleges are willing to practice affirmative action for white males. What's playing out, as described in this recent commentary in The Wall Street Journal, is a triggering of what scientists call the operational sex ratio. Studied more in the animal than ...


Economists have been saying this for months, but the government has made it official, as described in this New York Times article. From the article: As in previous recessions, male workers have borne the brunt of the job losses in the last two years. Since the recession began in December 2007, men have lost 7.4 million jobs on net, whereas women have lost 3.9 million jobs. In other words, both sexes are worse off than they were before the downturn, but men have suffered more. The types of jobs held by men and women help explain the shift. ...


Washington Post education columnist Valerie Strauss hosts a column by University of Virginia professor Daniel Willingham, someone I always go out of my way to read. Something isn't working in the way we teach reading, especially with boys....


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