Time to put down markers on the reauthorization of NCLB. That law, detested by most teachers and principals, opened up schools for (nearly) full data inspection. Schools were held accountable along the lines of race, ethnicity and income. At one point, this Times editorial appears to suggest that gender was part of that accountability package. Unfortunately, not so. Schools are required to collect numbers on gender, but they didn't have to do anything with the numbers. Naturally, the gender numbers become an obscure afterthought. That's unfortunate, because careful school researchers in places such as Chicago are discovering the "genderization of ...


The book is starting to draw some serious interest, which may lead to the issue drawing some serious interest among educators. In this country, that would be a first. Some of attention includes: -- An appearance on Fox & Friends. -- A profile by Washington Post education reporter Valerie Strauss. -- An appearance on WNYC's Brian Lehrer Show. -- A profile in the St. Louis Beacon....


Canada may be the latest country to leave the U.S. behind in searching for a solution to the boy troubles. School gender gaps there are every bit as stark as those found in this country, but public officials seem more open to addressing them. It all started with the president of the University of Alberta suggesting the university (and all of Canada, actually) needed to examine the campus gender gaps. That didn't go so well, as I wrote in Inside Higher Education. And now officials in nearby Calgary are taking a look at what they might do differently. Unlike ...


Until some flush foundation ponies up the cash to send on a worldwide fact finding trip about gender gaps, I'll rely on the google siphon to deliver my international findings. This from Jamaica....


If colleges can start up football programs for the sole purpose of attracting more guys, why shouldn't churches sponsor ultimate fighting bouts to accomplish the same? Sounds like a good idea to the faithful profiled in this New York Times story. After all, Jesus Christ was a fighter, pointed out one minister. From the article: The outreach is part of a larger and more longstanding effort on the part of some ministers who fear that their churches have become too feminized, promoting kindness and compassion at the expense of strength and responsibility. "The man should be the overall leader of ...


That's what I hear from boys, who in many cases do their homework but never bother turning it in. Sometimes they forget; other times they just think it's cooler to not turn it in. Now there's a new book about straightening out the disorganized lives of boys, That Crumpled Paper Was Due Last Week. Great title. Here's the book description on Amazon: Missed assignments. Lack of focus and enthusiasm. Falling grades. For too many boys and their frustrated parents, these are the facts of life. But they don't have to be. Top academic counselor Ana Homayoun has helped turn even ...


The publication sums up Judith Kleinfeld's latest paper and offers some useful links to other gender gap issues....


Boys, responding to the ever-younger ages that girls enter puberty, have their plans to ramp up their masculinity, as described in this New York Times piece. A Colby College professor has written a book on the topic, Packaging Boyhood. If only the adolescent boys realized their true sexual deficits: Much later in life women are spurning them as unsuitable "marriageable mates" because their educational attainment falls short. Trying explaining that to a middle school-er....


The Pew report on shifting economic relationships between men and women and the investigation by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights into college admissions discrimination against women are drawing attention to the gender gap issue. This Saturday I'll be a guest on Fox & Friends (at this point scheduled for 9:50 a.m. EST) to talk about those issues. Those are just symptoms, of course. The real issue is what's going on in K-12 schools that has led to decreased academic aspirations among boys. I anticipate that I will have an opportunity for a brief discussion of that issue ...


At age five, a third of poor boys in England can't write their names, compared to a sixth of poor girls, according the report described in the Guardian. In truth, this is just another indicator of the slow start boys everywhere get in verbal skills, which is why education reforms that have pushed intensified verbal skills into the earliest grades have impacted boys more than girls. What I find interesting about the British coverage of this issue is that the boy troubles are accepted as fact. The only debate is what to do about them. In a recent posting about ...


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