Usually, the New York Times (what am I going to do with they duck behind a pay wall?) does a great job pointing out gender trends in economic stories. This time they let us speculate about which jobs aren't coming back. (update: reader Scott Steinbrecher reminds me the wsj was a bit more direct in its story.) You don't need to be a Wharton whiz, however, to decode this one. These are jobs traditionally held by males, and they aren't coming back. The only mystery here is whether males will now get the message that females have understood for many ...


In England, Australia and New Zealand, the problem of slipping academic aspirations by boys is a steady news story. Here, The Telegraph lays out the numbers about British males. According to the latest figures, 30 per cent of women went into higher education in the mid-90s, compared with 29 per cent of men. But by 2009, the proportion of women on degree courses soared to 40 per cent, against only 32 per cent of men. For men to match the number of women going into university, an extra 25,000 males would have to enroll, according to these numbers. The ...


The New York Times does a service by collecting short essays from the nation's top marriage experts on the "marriageable mate" dilemma: How are we adjusting to the shifting economic and education relationships between men and women? Pay special attention to the piece by Ralph Richard Banks, who raises the key question: Will white women behave like black women? If they do, we can expect to see declining marriage rates and rising out of wedlock birth rates. My only quibble with the Times is that the editors continue to play cutesy with the issue. This time, they toy with an "alpha...


This report from the College Board was issued as part of a Capitol Hill panel of experts on the plight of minority males. It's all helpful, but I still get uncomfortable separating minority boys from boys overall. True, the most severe problems are found among those boys, but there's a thread connecting their problems to the issues found among all boys. The demand for a solution is more likely to arise from a broad base than a narrow one. Here's the report. From the press release: NEW YORK -- Minority male students continue to face overwhelming barriers in educational attainment, ...


A pair of studies of University of Alaska professor Judith Kleinfeld are available at the top of the Boys Project website. The beginning of the press release: Fairbanks, Alaska--Boys face high rates of a variety of mental health issues, in addition to lagging behind girls in academic performance and college attendance, according to two new papers by University of Alaska Fairbanks researcher Judith Kleinfeld. The studies, recently published in the journal Gender Issues, note that boys have higher rates of suicide, conduct disorders, emotional disturbance, premature death and juvenile delinquency than their female peers, as well as lower grades, test ...


That's the good news from the American Council on Education's Gender Equity in Higher Education report (available for purchase through ACE) but written about in today's Inside Higher Education and USA Today. The fact that gender gaps have leveled off is not surprising. Given the "man-cession" where nearly 80 percent of the layoffs have been males shouldn't we be seeing a dramatic reversal? Other than a jump in male enrollments at the community college level I haven't seen that. ACE does everyone a huge service by collecting the data, although in both stories I'm quoted taking exception to the tone ...


Today's editorial in the L.A. Times examines the college gender gaps, concludes that admitting slightly less qualified males is justified and then moves on to the heart of the matter: Why is this happening? Theories and arguments abound. Some say that boys are more active and thus less able to sit still for long periods -- and as a result, more likely to be categorized as having attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder or needing special education. A 2008 study by researchers at Northwestern University found that when girls are involved in a language-related task -- such as reading -- they ...


That's the headline the Wall Street Journal put atop my commentary running today. When I started researching the "boy troubles" I focused on elementary school -- looking for the causes -- and ended up gazing into the future. What are the consequences of these gender gaps? There are several: men disconnected from society, an economy lacking potential talent and the marriageable mate dilemma. This last one, the marriageable mate, is the most controversial of the three. Feminists bristle at the idea that a woman either has find an educationally compatible mate -- or even a mate at all. I try ...


For years now, conservatives have blamed feminized classrooms for boys falling behind. Less attention gets paid to what liberals blame (actually, if you're the AAWU or NOW you say: What boy troubles?). But anyone visiting classrooms and talking to liberal-leaning teachers will soon hear this explanation: The problem lies with the standards and accountability movement -- in particular, No Child Left Behind. This report from The Advancement Project -- Test, Punish, and Push Out: How Zero Tolerance and High-Stakes Testing Funnel Youth into the School to Prison Pipeline -- lays out the fine print behind that viewpoint. Their talking points: * ...


So many missed the point of yesterday's Pew study about the shifting economic relationships between men and women. Many TV producers and headline writers depicted men as somehow finding rich women to marry ...diamonds are now a man's best friend. Cute, but wrong. Today, one person got it right, Michael Gerson writing in the Washington Post. The heart of this issue lies in the tardiness men have exhibited in getting the education they need to compete in today's economy. Men aren't finding rich women to marry -- they're falling behind in earning power. Even that fact, however, doesn't capture the ...


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