I started my research looking at why boys fall behind in school, but it didn't take long for me to arrive at the bottom line of what all this means. Yes, the economy will suffer some as some talented men are left behind, but the impact felt by most will be what sociologists call the "marriageable mate" dilemma. That's the focus of a Pew report released today and fleshed out nicely by The New York Times. For a primer on this, go the marriageable mate category in the resource section of my blog, where I've been collecting articles about the ...


Nugent has one idea of what it takes for men to survive, here in the Washington Times. I have another. Successfully navigating school, I argue, is more urgent than surviving in the woods....


GMA nicely rolled the dice and put me on this morning. Against all odds I didn't freeze. They even built a nice web page on the issue. Let's hope this issue can get some national traction. The audience I'm looking for resides in the U.S. Department of Education: Isn't it time to launch an Australian-style investigation into the gender gaps?...


I debate Susan McGee Bailey, the author of the 1992 paper from AAUW arguing that schools are shortchanging girls (not boys). That's the study that got me started on Why Boys Fail. I wrote that up uncritically -- by hindsight, big mistake. Education Next went all out. They have a book excerpt, with me reading, and a video....


In theory, that happens today around 8:30 a.m. EST. We'll see...could get bumped. I'm here in New York doing book promotions. Yesterday I chatted on and off for an hour with Gil Gross from the San Francisco powerhouse station KGO....


Understandable, but still interesting. Actually, what's striking about the coverage of the gender issues by womens enews is its evenhandedness. Refreshing....


One could read that into this article in Inside Higher Education documenting a surge in male enrollment in community colleges: The Men Are Back January 13, 2010 For the first time in many years, a number of community colleges are reporting that their enrollment of male students this past fall either outpaced or equaled that of female students. Tidewater Community College, in Virginia, saw a 16 percent increase in the enrollment of male students this past fall compared to fall 2008. During the same time period, female enrollment grew by 11.5 percent. Still, women are 61 percent of the ...


Reviews for Why Boys Fail, which is released this week, come from a reporter at education.com and a book reviewer for an online publication aimed at librarians. The education.com review gets more into the issue, while the other deals more with how the book is structured, astutely observing that I wrote the book as an extended commentary. That's my background and that's how I wanted the book to read. I had one big point to make, and I wanted to make sure that point didn't get lost in a swarm of observations about boys in school. The review ...


On January 26 the College Board Advocacy and Congressional TriCaucus will sponsor a conference on how to steer more minority males into and through college. Although the press release wisely links that goal to President Obama's goal of boosting college graduation rates, the groups miss something: There's something in common about the boy problems, something shared between inner city black and Latino males and their suburban counterparts and that commonality involves literacy skills. The difference: one group has the flu, the other a mild cold. Discovering that shared issue (and at this point the U.S. Department of Education appears ...


In her new blog as Public Editor for the National Education Writers Association, The Educated Reporter, Linda Perlstein wrote a Top Ten list of education stories of 2009. (Okay, I'm a little tardy reporting this.). But this article by AP higher education writer Justin Pope is worth repeating. An Associated Press analysis of government data on the 83 federally designated four-year HBCUs shows just 37 percent of their Black students finish a degree within six years. That's 4 percentage points lower than the national college graduation rate for Black students. One major reason: the struggles of Black men. Just 29 ...


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