Not part of your daily vocabulary? Nor mine. I guess that's why I'm not an academic. That and the fact I lack a doctorate. So, Wikipedia to the rescue: Misandry (pronounced /mɪˈsændri/) is hatred (or contempt) of men or boys. Misandry comes from Greek misos (μῖσος, "hatred") and anēr, andros (ἀνήρ, gen. ἀνδρός; "man"). It is parallel to misogyny--the hatred of women or girls. Misandry is also comparable with (but not the same as) misanthropy which is the hatred of humanity in general. The prefix miso-, meaning 'Hatred' or 'To hate' applies in many other words, such ...


(Sorry, I thought this got posted yesterday ... still learning the system here) Regarding this new study, which found that students in New York City Charters outperform students in the broader public system: -- This should not come as a surprise. One of Joel Klein's first actions was to lure the highest performing charter operators into New York -- Uncommon Schools, Achievement First and KIPP. In some cases, the bait was $1 a year leases in existing public schools. Not all charters are alike. These three spun off excellent schools. I like to compare New York to Chicago, which leaned toward ...


The indefatigable PBS reporter has an interesting piece here about Ritalin, conflicts of interest between drug companies and parent groups and much, much more. The piece points out that the United States consumes five times as much ADD medicines as the rest of the planet. And guess who's taking those meds: four times as many boys as girls....


Okay, for anyone following state test scores over the past several years, you already knew that. But it comes at a good time -- just when the White House is announcing a $250 million STEM initiative. But, here you have it from the American Psychological Association. Take that, Larry Summers. Actually, Summers wouldn't dispute these findings. He was talking about the outer fringe of the talented and untalented. From their press release: WASHINGTON - Girls around the world are not worse at math than boys, even though boys are more confident in their math abilities, and girls from countries where ...


...What does that mean? Answering that question is the cover story of the Economist this week. The magazine has a great collection of essays and articles. Most of the commentary is focused exactly where it should be -- on accommodating women in the workforce with improved childcare, maternity leave, etc. As for their explanation of this development: The feminisation of the workforce has been driven by the relentless rise of the service sector (where women can compete as well as men) and the equally relentless decline of manufacturing (where they could not). True enough. In the United States, as many ...


On the surface, that's a logical response, and this column by Valerie Strauss in The Washington Post lays out the argument for recruiting more men for the classroom. The decline in educational aspirations among boys seen over the last two decades -- responsible for the fact that nearly 58 percent of bachelor's degrees and 62 percent of associate's degrees now go to women -- coincides with the decline in the number of males teaching. From the column: Men Teach, a non-profit organization that encourages men to enter teaching, reports that in 2008, 18.8% of all elementary and middle school ...


(Articles by me are asterisked. Hold your mouse over the headlines for more details. Click on a topic to jump to that section of the page.) Uncategorized | The General Topic | Literacy | College Admission Preferences | College Dropouts | College Years | Minority Boys | Changing Economics | Pushback Movement | Schools That Work for Boys | Male Teachers | Social Consequences | Math/Science | Single-Sex Schools | Workplace Changes | Key Reports | Good Contacts | Reading About Boys | Blue-collar Whites | Gender learning differences? | Latinos Uncategorized NYT magazine cover story The General Topic Australia's report on boys falling behind Report on girls reveals boy lapses State of American Manhood Mortenson's famous "for every ...


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