« Tutoring for Tots | Main | Class Size: Is Bigger Better? »

Educational Technology: What's Behind the Hype?

| 51 Comments

Laptops, Internet access, scanners, and video cameras can help teachers and students access information and resources quickly and easily. Digital imagery, PowerPoint presentations, and microphones create fun, interactive classrooms.

But access and ease do not equal knowledge and comprehension, according to Peter N. Berger in his Oct. 26 Education Week Commentary. In the midst of all the educational technology hype, Berger writes that we have lost sight of the basics of learning and teaching.

How effective is cutting-edge equipment in improving actual achievement? Behind all the bells and whistles, does high-tech gear really help students learn? Tell us what you think.

51 Comments

An interesting topic for debate. I teach English Language at a women's university in the UAE where all students have laptops, and each classroom has 30 internet connections. A lot of money has been invested in technology. Despite the fact that this technology does allow access to a lot of information, the students are not sufficiently information literate to be able to access and evaluate much of this information. Students also spend a large amount of time chatting on the Web, and it's difficult to get them to turn their laptops off when they are not required in class. I have yet to come across any research that demonstrates that using this technology produces higher learning gains than not using it. Are we all just jumping on the bandwagon? I'm beginning to think certain technologies actually do more harm than good.

Skeptic, UAE

It is easy to speak when you live an ivy tower. When your teachers get 4-5,000 $ salary per month with beautiful classrooms.
Technology is much better than face to face education when you do not have a warm classroom, a teacher for the 3/4 of the year, even no blackboard. But you can have a laptop in every village and internet in every village with GSM connection. You have only one program made at $ 1 million then you rich 12 million students. Sure face to face is better than technolgy when you have wonderful teachers and wonderful classrooms. Don't leave in utopia. Get out of your cage ( ??? ) or what.
Even in the US has been using e-education today 10,000 times mor than 15 years ago. You cannot send a good teacher to north of north Dakota.
Education technology will solve the problems of poor countries not the rich ones.
Best regards.
Muvaffak GOZAYDIN
e-learning advocate of Turkey

It is easy to speak when you live an ivy tower. When your teachers get 4-5,000 $ salary per month with beautiful classrooms.
Technology is much better than face to face education when you do not have a warm classroom, a teacher for the 3/4 of the year, even no blackboard. But you can have a laptop in every village and internet in every village with GSM connection. You have only one program made at $ 1 million then you rich 12 million students. Sure face to face is better than technolgy when you have wonderful teachers and wonderful classrooms. Don't leave in utopia. Get out of your cage ( ??? ) or what.
Even in the US has been using e-education today 10,000 times mor than 15 years ago. You cannot send a good teacher to north of north Dakota.
Education technology will solve the problems of poor countries not the rich ones.
Best regards.
Muvaffak GOZAYDIN
e-learning advocate of Turkey
[email protected]
[email protected]

IMHO, technology in our school is given a high priority from the administration. This is a key component in teachers wanting to use technology. Also, our students are digital natives. They may not have all the skills, but they are not afraid to try to create digital media. Our staff, all digital immigrants, only use computers as instructional tools in place of traditional strategies. Like using DVD movies in the place of 16 mm film projectors (anyone remember those in your classroom?) The goal should be to construct our digital classrooms so our students use the technology to carry their learning from lower cognitive levels to the higher levels. Good teaching is not just putting the student in front of the newest PC or fancy wireless laptops...it is about connecting with the lives of the students and meeting their needs so they love to learn, even if you do not have a warm room or blackboards. Computers are just one tool in the toolbox of educators. Sure there is a digital divide, but if you have it...use it.

Two quick comments out of many that I could make.

1. Many schools that are criticized for spending money on technology without producing results are not putting enough of that funding into people. You can't just put new computers or laptops into classrooms and expect teachers to know how to utilize them, and teachers are busy people with lives (family, secondary jobs, coaching, etc.) outside of school so they don't have the time and/or drive to learn how to integrate technology on their own.

Schools need to make sure that they have the support in place - troubleshooters and curriculum technology staff - to help the teachers on a daily basis.

2. Does anyone have facts to show that the funding put into libraries in schools produces increases in test scores? With technology we can bring entire libraries of current information (not from 10 year old encyclopedias) into the classroom. Instead of film rentals (I still remember the old 16 mm films) you can have video on demand from sources such as United Streaming.

And what about the funding that goes into athletic facilities and programs, music programs, etc. What evidence is there that these expenditures have increased test scores? Maybe these programs and technology have value because they will be lifelong skills that will enrich students lives.

As a high school English teacher, I always sought out projects to inspire my students and incorporate the technology available in our school. It helped to have awesome librarians who, without being too tech savvy, were ready to try any project I came up with.

Several desires prompted this:
1) to help motivate and reach students who enjoy technology and give them a chance to shine in classwork
2) to prepare students with group and technological skills they may build on in further education or career pursuits
3) to help build the critical skills of deciding what information is important, accurate and relevant to the task at hand. (Mr. Davidson, it is YOUR job to teach your students how to critically evaluate the merits and drawbacks of any source they use, electronic or print, not ebmoan the fact that they don't. You'd do the same with a novel or newspaper.)

These are common goals for any teacher or any subject area. As others have said here, in the toolbox teachers have, technology is one tool we can use to help our students learn.

I agree that it takes professional development directly related to impacting student learning if the use of fancy technology tools are to benefit students and schools. I have witnessed that when in 2001 our school embarked on getting the "stuff" but the emphasis was on helping teachers use it. Sure, we had a whole lot of bells and whistles, but it was the end product we were searching for. Take a look at our best practices and journals from that year at http://www.wcschools.com/mjhs/tlcf. Then we helped those schools around us by mentoring as many as ten schools and/or districts. We are now represent the Upper Cumberland Region in TN as an anchor school assisting technology coaches. Our consortium is producing another website depicting our story at http://www.edtechcoach.com.

There's not really a debate until you factor in working one on one and in small groups so that teachers understand the impact of technology on learning. Because our emphasis was on student-centered and project-based learning, I am confident it has helped our students become better informed about content. It's about students asking more questions than they answer. It's in the asking that learning takes place.

You ask about scores... Have our scores gone up. Yes. Can we directly associate it with technology. No. But I know for sure, it's because students have used the technology along with teachers who are prepared to help them get the most from those resources.

Check out our Best Practices and feel free to use our lessons in your own setting.
Diane Bennett, Technology Coach
Mt. Juliet High School, Tennessee

I believe you need cutting edge technology to help students achieve more. However, you must first teach the teachers how to use this cutting edge technology and then help them to create lesson plans that incorporates the Standard Course of Study and the new technology. If you don't offer staff development to the teachers, the teachers won't be able to fully utilize the new technology. This staff development should not be a one time offering; there should be several follow up sessions to find out problems, successes, and more staff development.

Hi All,

This conversation NEVER changes. (See Larry Cuban's body of work.) The bottom line always has to do with the way in which educational technology is being used to transform classroom learning. Too often technology is used to confirm and "slicken up" old ways of doing things. Jeopardy style games and blue tooth clickers (and such) are NOT what kids need. A curriculum, and related technology tools, that allow them to work in a constructivist manner and a group of teachers who are aware of technologies "power-pointless" pit-fallsis what the doctor ordered!


IMHO......Jim Forde of edtechnot.com

Yes, there is a growing body of research that shows that the services and materials provided by strong school media programs directly affects student achievement. Visit the American Association of School Librarians at http://www.ala.org/aasl and look at "Issues and Advocacy".

Technology is useful if you know how to use it effectively; most people don't.
Just because you can get 100K hits on Google about the planet Mars, doesn't mean you know what to do with the information or even need it.
Just because you have access to a library doesn't mean you know how to use it, or even do.
Making education entertaining through the use of technology has a down-side, the expectation of always being entertained during the learning process AND that if I'm not being entertained, I must not be learning.
Learning takes effort. No Doubt we can do a better job and technology can help, but in the final analysis it's just another tool; it's not the only tool.

To answer one of Craig's questions, investments in school libraries AND technology result in proven increases in student achievement.
See: http://www.ala.org/aaslTemplate.cfm?Section=studentachieve

Much too complicated of an issue to address the challenges without first determining the end goal of "using technology" in the classroom. I am of the belief that if we are talking only in terms of methodology, the delivery method for instruction, then once again the research is clear...The classroom teacher is the one who will have the most impact on student achievement. So as istructional leaders in our schools, it is our responsibility to provide on-going training, monitor with integrity the instructional process and have in place a strong accountability system.

Where I work, we developed the Reading Plus reading program based on 70 years of research. We used to use a filmstrip in a guided reader, now we do the same job with computers. We train the teachers extensively. Once they understand the program and their part in it, the students make remarkable progress. The technology is important. The testing and training the students get with the computers would be difficult to accomplish without them. Children today are growing up in a technology dependent world, and they do learn better with it; but the teachers are critical. The teachers are the ones who make it all make sense.

Technology may be used as a tool to enhance student learning. I say "may" because it all depends on its integration. Many times, this is based on the individual teacher. Rarely do school districts develop an initiative that blends technology integration with instructional methodology. As educational leaders, we should examine the research conducted by Henry Becker http://www.crito.uci.edu/tlc/html/tlc_home.html to inform us how pedagogy impacts technology, and vice versa. His study of the 1998 Teaching, Learning, and Computing nation survey reveals a connection between Internet (computer) use and instructional beliefs and practices.

Spending thousands of dollars on hardware/software will not increase student achievement. The key to using technology in the classroom is teacher training, but after-school or summer workshops have not proven beneficial. The most effective teacher training I've witnessed is job-embedded, release time training during the regular school day. Teachers are provided training and return to the classrooms to implement instructional strategies to involve students' use of technology to produce authentic work. Technology is the means by which we can tap into our students' interests and expertise, providing some students their first opportunity to be leaders among their peers.

If we all agree that learning goals, for any group of learners, are established first, then instructional design follows based on the most appropriate tools for the support of learning, then yes, technology tools can certainly improve student learning.

We also owe it to our students to help them make sense and meaning out of the chaos of information to which they are exposed in this digital age. Information and media literacy skills are essential. Computer-mediated communication permits authentic learning experiences with real audiences and editors. Connections between ideas, concepts and even real people can be explored in ways never before possible.

This all depends, though, on well-trained and prepared educators who are able to exploit technology as tools as they instruct. I agree that too often we overlook the much-needed training for educators who are usually digital immigrants teaching to the digital native culture. Studies have demonstrated that teachers themselves agree that the number one issue about using technology for them is lack of professional development time to train. How and when to provide the training are very tricky issues for most schools and boards. Perhaps this is the real question about effectiveness of technology in education.

Sharon Peters
grad. student (M.A.) Education Technology, Concordia University
senior school teacher
Lower Canada College
Montréal, Canada

It is clear that if any technology is used in the wrong way it can harm students more than it can help them learn. It is also clear that some technologies are harder to use productively than others. When we help teachers better understand how people learn and empower them with technologies that let them easily take advantage of this understanding, we get results. Classroom Response Systems(CPS) are an example of technology that makes sense. They are easy to use and inexpensive only requiring one computer and a projector in the classroom. Students have remote controls that allow them only to answer a question when one is opened by the teacher. The teacher maintains control but still has a tool that encourages everyone to get involved. Individuals are more likely to get involved in discussion and defend their positions because they take heart when they see the histogram that is automatically displayed when the teacher closes the question. They see that they are not the only ones that think "A" is the right answer! The teacher also knows immediately when a question requires more time and when it doesn't.

But even this wonderful tool is not a magic solution... so we must continue to understand how people learn and keep our teachers up to date.

I think it is like anything...the most important thing in the room is the teacher and that relationship with the students to be certain quality teaching and learning happens. So, while there is so much available to us in the way of technology, strategies,& best practices; it is only as good as is the teacher in that classroom.

I observe and tape teacher interns as they use technology in their classrooms as one of the state of Maryland's certification requirements. What I see every time is that the use of technology becomes a very rich setting for problem solving for students and instructors. I also see team work and negotiation as students work together on a common project. Doing the same task with paper and pencil does not seem to provide the same dynamics for exploration.

I video tape interns as they use technology in their classes as part of Maryland's technology requirement for certification. I find that the use of technology provides a rich platform for negotiation and team work.

I do not believe that the focus of education on the basics of learning and teaching has been lost. Teaching in a rural community school, I would love to have a problem utilizing the up and coming technology in my classroom. Therefore, I believe that technology used properly could only enhance learning. (I know this has been true for me.)

Oh, how we love to make such discussions so complex! In my mind, and confirmed my a great deal of research, there is a powerful interplay between media and method. You cannot have one without the other. Technology alone will never make a poor or mediocre teacher a good one, nor, will it make a poor student a good one. It is still about effective teaching and what the learner brings to the learning situation. The tools simply facilitate the methods and interact with the background experiences, learning styles, motivational levels, etc... of the students. If we would only keep our discussions and energies focused on what makes good teaching and powerful learning, the tools that we use become of secondary importance in supporting this end. When technology comes first in the equation, it only detracts from this goal.

Think Bloom's taxonomy. If the software is available for a student to display/teach their fundamental knowledge of content area from the core curriculum areas of history, science, mathematics and language arts then they have not only learned their content standards in these areas but also in the area of technology.
The key is having a technology teacher to assist classroom teachers in creating computer or technology lessons to expand upon regular classroom learning. Although we are an elementary school, our students have completed the national high school standards for technology because of this approach.

I am glad to see many comments that affirm the use of technology with education. And the points that it is all in how you use it that makes the difference. If you do the same thing but now with technology, there will be little improvement although technology has been shown to engage the Gen Y or Millenial kids so there may even be some improvement in achievement by just doing that.

The real benefits come when you change the classroom environment and approach to education such that the students can truly take advantage of the technology to learn and communicate in new ways and the teacher takes on a new role. I have seen many examples of this and the incredible imapcts it has had on individual students and entire schools. Working with teachers is key as is leadership within the schools.

To help teachers learn new technology skills and then integrate technology into the core curriculum, Nortel created Nortel LearniT, a not-for-profit organization who's goal is to help prepare teachers and subsquently students and other learners to develop skills they will need to be successful to live and work in the 21st century. Everything on the site is free and open. This includes video instruction, core curricular lesson plans and supporting material. www.nortellearnit.org

It is important that we introduce technology to our students as much and as early as possible. Before long it will be just as important for them to understand how to use computers and other forms of technology as it will be to read and do math in order to function in our society.

I am fortunate to work in a school in which technological equipment is plentiful. However, I do not believe that the presence of equipment is the most important factor in achieving excellence in our schools or our society. The appropriate use of that equipment is essential. Unfortunately, the idea that cutting-edge technology equates with high academic achievement is rampant among students and faculty alike. I believe, however, that much creativity and productivity can be realized if we first and foremost focus on sound reasoning and thinking skills. Therefore, the need for excellent teaching has not diminished with the advancement of techological gadgetry.

Besides his personal experience, where is Mr. Berger's evidence for technology having "no discernible effect"? The one study he cites, a reanalysis of 2000 PISA data by economists Thomas Fuchs and Ludger Woessmann, did not exactly find that technology hurt student performance, but that the positive effects of technology noted in earlier analyses of the same data depended on how the technology was used. This same point has been made by many of the practitioners who responded to this EW article. Technology's effects always interact with curriculum and instruction, and there is ample evidence that this interaction can be positive and significant. See, for instance, the research summaries and article reviews at the Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology (http://caret.iste.org).

The basics: it's the teacher, not the program, not the technology. I love my laptop...it's my business lifeline. I chat with my college freshman daughter. I would not be without it. Love my digital camera, etc. etc. However, I still use my old Pentax K1000, wouldn't part with it. Still call my daughter and friends on the phone so I can hear their voices. My 14 year old son, who was part of a progressive Laptop initiative in my state for 7th graders, said the other day "I am SO glad we don't have laptops this year." He explained, "Oh they were great for playing games." They played until they got caught, then found another game site til they got caught on that. I wish they had had SSR instead. They had a forestry unit. They looked up sites on forestry statistics. They visited forestry sites that were amazing. They did NOT visit....a forest!!!! There's one right behind our school. It was disconcerting to go by the middle school classrooms and see the glassy eyes and slumped bodies over their laptops. My husband mentions here that aren't kids more and more out of shape these days? Should we remove laptops? Not necessarily. Are they bad? Definitely not! Do we need to use our common sense and be good teachers who not only use technology judiciously but recognize that some kids are not all that interested. They need to be computer savvy, I agree...but it doesn't take long to learn. My son has a computer, he has all his songs organized. He is writing songs and has them stored.....etc. etc. all done by using it, and according to his interest. My daughter did not have the laptop program and she can keep up with the best of them on her laptop.....Every college we visited has a technology support program. If we want to get them to understand it earlier then maybe we should start driver ed at age 10! After all, they will need to drive, a car can be a dangerous thing if not prepared. I say we are going overboard too soon and forgetting the very nature of being a child. If we are going to insist on tech. classes more and more, then we'd better double up on phys ed, music and art (not kidpix, sorry)

Educational Technology’s biggest problem has been its focus on how much stuff can we deploy: hardware, software, connectivity and dollars spent. Buzz words like “digital divide” and state goals of 4:1 computer ratio or 1:1 computing all miss the real point, “how is technology going to make a difference.” The other day I witnessed a district arguing on whether it should have three computers per classroom or five. No discussion on what was going to be done with the equipment. Vendors don’t help the problem. The recent laptop initiatives are good examples of the “buy more stuff” approach.

The key is to look at each grade level and content area and identify the one or two technologies that would make the biggest difference and then focus on making those programs work. This might mean streaming video in a Social Studies Classroom, probes in a Chemistry Lab, or laptops for Elementary students learning writing styles. In this approach there is no one size fits all solution. It might mean the purchase of fewer computers and the purchase of more specialized devices. With this approach solutions become imbedded in teacher’s daily instructional process. Only when part of the instructional process will technology really make a difference.

Technology tools are not limited to the classroom any more than typewriters were decades ago. As a seventh grade student, I can remember staying up late at night typing research papers on a manual typewriter given to me by my aunt. My parents and two younger sisters would be trying to sleep while I typed. My mom kept shouting, "Go to bed! You need your rest!" I can remember wishing there were some way to get the paper done without keeping my parents awake with a noisy typewriter. Hm. Now there is.
It is not the sole purpose of in-class learning for which technology is such an integral part of the classroom. It is for the world beyond. Obviously, students are going to leave the classroom and teachers want them to take away more than factual knowledge for standardized tests. The technology inside the classroom is usually behind that used in the work world or for commerce. Why hobble students further by not making them technologically savvy for their own future and ours? We don't educate for tests, we educate for life.

Teachers need to implement current technologies to prepare students for their future workplace, whether it increases student achievement or not. These technologies must be accessible in the classroom for both the teacher and the students before we will see any any impact on student achievement. Currently, most students in most schools use the computer 15 to 30 minutes a week if they are lucky. A variety of engaging strategies and activities must be implemented by the teacher. Parents and students must also possess the desire to achieve and learn.

I do feel that technology is very important. I just feel we need a balace between technology and teaching the basics in the classroom. Technology used correctly can can help to teach concepts and be a useful resource. It is important to introduce and enhance students technology skills and use technology as a tool to increase academic skills. I am fortunate to work in a school where technology is used as a tool to increase student learning.

Technology is the future, whether one likes it or not, it is best to be prepared. Students who use technology in all of it's different forms are preparing themselves for the future.

I have seen technology used correctly and I have seen it also abused, by both students and teachers. But the bottomline is that we as educators have an obligation to provide students with the keys to the future. And technology is part of that future.

As educators, we need to view technology as part of educating our students for their future, not a new tool to keep students interested in learning. The problem in education is many educators and administrators feel technology is the access to a computer. Technology should be integrated into the learning environment to prepare students to enter the world with knowledge and skills to continue learning and improving. Until administration and educators view technology as a tool to aid in preparing students for the future through "real world" application, we will continue to see computers used only as remediation with the bells and whistles that many believe are required to maintain concentration.

Having recently completed a distance learning course, I can see without any doubt the future of technology as an added teaching tool of great potential. My experience also leads me to believe that the sooner students learn to become proficient in using this technology for educational purposes, the better their opportunities for achievement. What I see as still a potential drawback is instructors who are not able to effectively communicate to students the value of a subject, course, or particular discussion, or how to best use the technology to gain a practical advantage, rather than as just a fancy "telephone." As both my parents were teachers, I still believe well prepared teachers make a huge difference, but it would be a mistake to ignore or minimize the impact technology can have on the learning experience when put to good use. What this really calls for is strong commitment to learning on the part of the teachers, so they know how to use the technology for best results, the students, so as not to abuse the technology, and on the part of their parents (I haven't seen them mentioned much in comments above) to help students focus in on these goals and partner with them in their educational experience.

Although the obvious up side of using technology is the attraction of the students to it I believe the real benefit lie in its ability to differentiate the curriculum.
Technology is always looked at for the obvious but think about it this way. A properly designed curriculum will allow a greater amount of student curriculum differentiation while allowing the teacher to focus on those students truely in need of additional help. Schools look at technology for all the wrong reasons. It should be looked at not only from a pedegogical angle but definitely from a cost savings approach. It is in every other business but not in education. Why?

Technology in the classroom is an integral part of learning because it is an integral part of the world. It is not that students cannot learn without the bells and whistles of PowerPoint or a laptop in front of them, it simply makes them more willing to participate in the learning process. When they are inticed with the latest technology they are engaged no matter what the subject material. Let's face it, as educators, sometimes our job is to trick students into putting forth the effort to learn.

I believe that this prompt has "hit a nerd"! (me included) Great postings. Yes...yes...yes... the devil is always in the details. It is all about how a thoughtful deployment of technology in a curricularly relevant way. There is nothing inherent in the harware that will automatically result in achievement gains. (regardless of what the glossy ads in ed tech mags say)

Great Stuff.

Jim --> edtechnot.com

Glad to see edtechnot.org weigh in a positive way in regards to this discussion - some of the editorializing articles at the site trash the very idea of technology in the classroom. And while I agree that sound curricular practices should be part of the drive in establishing technological "need", ask yourselves this: how have you been posting to this discussion? Shouldn't students be able to participate in similar fashion to discussions, blogs, wikis, cooperative shared document creation, etc., etc.? This is REALITY these days, folks - get used to it.

Hey Lee,

I agree that using technology in this way, by having students passionately defend their ideas within a structured blog-like environement, is a great idea. I imagine my eigth grader being able to debate issues in the role of a colonist in this way, or defending environmental policies etc. But is this what he is currently doing with the available technology? Short answer...NO.

This is why I think the articles that question appropriate uses of technology need to be looked at and reacted to by ed tech enthusiasts. (The site shoulod really be called edtechmaybe.com)

Believe me when I say I enjoy the idea of ed tech in the classroom. I used to run a "hypercard" club and was the first to use level III laserdisc programming in my school. Can you say "old school"?

Thanks Lee (and all) for a great posting(s) and for caring enough to continue the conversation.

Jim --> edtechnot.com

Please excuse my typos above on the words "environment" and "should".

I hope these errors don't distract from the amazing (kidding) content of the posting.

Jim :-)

We don't know. the literature does not include a vaialbe number of experimental studies whose aim is to determine the effects of traditional versus technology-based instruction. Distance learning, for example, would appear to require unique sequencing and content formatting, as well as close attention to how cognitive tasks are carried out under particular circumstances. Also, assessment approaches must be tailored to the instructtional approaches used. Until and unless fundamental research is carried out in a substantive number and type of settings, we don't know. But, on the Metro, I did see a 4 year old, Spanish-only child with his Spanish-only mother fully engaged in a hand-held game! I bet he can use a computer as well. So, why wait? The opportunities for research are abundant.

We don't know. The literature does not include a viable number of experimental studies whose aim is to determine the effects of traditional versus technology-based instruction. Distance learning, for example, would appear to require unique sequencing and content formatting, as well as close attention to how cognitive tasks are carried out under particular circumstances. Also, assessment approaches must be tailored to the instructional approaches used. Until and unless fundamental research is carried out in a substantive number and type of settings, we don't know. But, on the Metro, I did see a 4 year old, Spanish-only child with his Spanish-only mother fully engaged in a hand-held game! I bet he can use a computer as well. So, why wait? The opportunities for research are abundant.

I'm trying to write a paper (due tomorrow) on distance learning and staff development, issues, challenges and trends. Does anyone have any information where I might find published papers on the net? I have covered distance learning, but having difficulty finding resources for K-12 staff development in distance learning.

Still need some assistance with any information available on distance learning and staff development issues with respect to K-12. I've located lots of information on post grad and univerity environments, but there doesn't seem to be a lot of documented research on K-12 issues.

At my institution, universal wireless web access has been provided for and mandated, top-down. The main use that I've observed is surfing during classes. I suspect that as long as we mix person-to-person interaction with (ahem) P2P-interactivity, human contact will suffer. Mediated communication will trump direct communication in asymmetric learning--or, if there's a teacher who is telling, and a student who is listening, the teacher is put on hold. Fine for e-classes (asymmetry flattened), but for dialog in person? "I'm sorry Socrates...you're breaking up. Were you talking to me?" Well, apparently not.

People think just put the PC in front of children and forget about it.
We need PC plus WONDERFULL SOFWARE for learning, making children as if they living onn the screen. I believe that people are learning just living the situations. PC and sodftware just simulates the life and allows you to respond as well.
Unfortunately still there are not very very good software for grades 1 to 12 . If you claim there are please let me know. If they are I am willing to buy them.
Best regards for all the people responding to this forum.
[email protected]

People think just put the PC in front of children and forget about it.
We need PC plus WONDERFULL SOFWARE for learning, making children as if they living onn the screen. I believe that people are learning just living the situations. PC and software just simulates the life and allows you to respond as well.
Unfortunately still there are not very very good software for grades 1 to 12 . If you claim there are please let me know. If they are I am willing to buy them.
Best regards for all the people responding to this forum.
[email protected]

Technological approch to studying is an important instrument to good learning, but i still disagree the fact that its capable of replacing our old pattern of learning,(face to face).Because learning is all about bringing the inside knowledge of a child and impacting the new external knowledge to the child and the best way of achieving this is through face interaction with the child,exposing the child to peer groups ,as we know socialization is gotten through interacting and learning the ways of life of the people.
so one can aquire true knowledge by having direct contact,asking questions,finding out ideas though interactions and having challanges. but with TL,its not so because it reduceses challanges, motivation and opportunity of direct contact to real life problems.
Personally, i recomend the continuing of face to face learning for better and productive result.

People think just put the PC in front of children and forget about it.
We need PC plus WONDERFULL SOFWARE for learning, making children as if they living onn the screen. I believe that people are learning just living the situations. PC and software just simulates the life and allows you to respond as well.
Unfortunately still there are not very very good software for grades 1 to 12 . If you claim there are please let me know. If they are I am willing to buy them.
Best regards for all the people responding to this forum.

Comments are now closed for this post.

Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • children's education: People think just put the PC in front of children read more
  • Paula Igwe: Technological approch to studying is an important instrument to good read more
  • Muvaffak GOZAYDIN Education Technologist: People think just put the PC in front of children read more
  • Muvaffak GOZAYDIN Education Technologist: People think just put the PC in front of children read more
  • Dr. Bruce C. Meyer: At my institution, universal wireless web access has been provided read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here

Pages