Eduwonkette hangs up her cape. (Lots of good farewell comments, too.)...


Nancy Flanagan on the potential "Obama Effect" on student achievement: But I also believe that for individual students, the election and inauguration can function as Aretha's hat did for ladies across the country: I want that. How do I get it?...


If you judged NYC Educator’s literature students solely by the numbers, you’d be pretty impressed with his teaching. They read the books they’re assigned, they pass the tests, and 90 percent of them are getting credit for it. NYC Educator himself is disappointed, however. His students do the work, he says, but they hate reading, something he found out after candidly asking them if they enjoyed an assigned book. "No one likes books," ventured one kid, unmindful of the conversation that would ensue. "People love books," I said. "Why do you think every town has a library? ...


TLN's John Norton, no one's idea of a technophobe, points out there are good reasons why educators should care about the decline of cursive writing....


President Barack Obama’s historic inauguration on Tuesday served as inspiration for millions of people in America and abroad. Many teachers are excited that their students of color have a role model they can identify with, in one of the most powerful positions in the world. Robert Pondiscio of the Core Knowledge Blog worries, however, that the deeper significance of Obama’s historic inauguration speech was, perhaps ironically, lost on many of the students who heard it. It’s bittersweet to consider that many students–indeed, many Americans–lack a full appreciation of the moment and their new President’s ...


After a difficult semester, J. of Mildly Melancholy was relieved of her position at an NYC charter school earlier this month. It wasn't unexpected: I knew something bad was coming, but I didn't want to think it was real, and I didn't think it would happen so soon. This week has been really awful in my classroom (and across the entire grade, actually). I haven't been a happy person at this job, and I haven't been a very effective teacher. So it's actually kind of a big relief. She finds one immediate benefit to being an ex-teacher: She no longer ...


In his New York Times blog, Proof, English teacher Alexander Nazaryan admits that teachers need a drink: For the average drinker, alcohol provides mental escape, but for teachers that escape is physical, too—after spending entire days surrounded by children or teenagers, we are retreating to the one place that will be—ideally—certifiably child-free… Unlike most other professions, this one drains you completely, refilling you with its own insular, infinite concerns. The intensity may ebb and flow, but it never disappears...Drinking together allows us [to] reclaim an experience that is too often defined by politicians, bureaucrats and reformers ...


Upon reading Thomas Friedman’s call for an economic stimulus package that includes tax cuts for teachers, Barnett Berry contends that young educators want more than dollars and cents. [There is} an influx of Gen Y teachers who tell us that the keys to recruiting and retaining talent will require better preparation and tuned-in resources for teaching in high-needs schools, more time to work with colleagues and social workers in solving family and social problems their students face, and new opportunities to serve in major leadership roles to dramatically change the schools in which they teach. Innovative ways to pay ...


It’s appropriate that the ed-tech blog Education Futures is making predictions about the future of education and technology. Education Futures blogger John Moravec details his second annual predictions of what to expect in the coming year. Here’s the short version: 1. No Child Left Behind won’t get left behind … 2. The economic downturn will get much worse before it gets better, but the international impact will be greater than within the U.S. … 3. With limits in available venture capital and new development funds within corporations, technological innovation will slow in the United States … 4. The footprint ...


New York Times parenting blogger Lisa Belkin reports that Charles Saylors will become the first male president of the national Parent Teacher Association this June, the first dad to assume the role in the organization's 112-year history. Belkin says the involvement of both parents in a child's education--including joining the PTA, which is only 10 percent male on the national level--has a positive impact. The National Household Education Survey by the US Department of Education found that: Students whose fathers were highly involved at school were 43 percent more likely to receive As. Children of highly involved resident fathers were ...


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