Mei Flower notes, from her teacher's perspective, that one of the most positive results of Obama's win may be its effect on African-American boys: In the past few weeks, I've noticed a difference in these students. I've noticed that they hold their heads a little higher. I've noticed that they've buckled down a little harder. I've noticed that they've looked me in the eye, and they've gotten a spark of enthusiasm, and they are talking about their futures because they believe they HAVE futures now. ... It's possible that Barack Obama will leave office without passing even one law, without forging ...


Web 2.0 enthusiast Will Richardson says it's a day for print newspaper covers (even if you can do it, with your students, on the Web). No matter how the impact of paper newspapers is declining, at moments like these, there’s still nothing like the front page of the paper, not the website, that gives me goosebumps. And in that vein, I’m cruising through the hundreds of covers from around the world at Newseum. Amazing....


Eduwonk guesses at the implications of Obama's victory. The economy was a key to the broader coalition Obama was able to assemble in this election and trumps other issues. That likely means (a) more rhetoric from our field about how education and the economy are linked and (b) despite that, second tier status for education for at least a while....


Mr. Teacher reports on the mock election at his school. Talk about your undecideds: Walking around the room while the kids were voting, I noticed that one child had put a check in the box for McCain, and he was writing in Obama's name on the write-in line. I had to explain to him how this was not proper procedure. The results, in case you're wondering, follow the trend in child voting this year. . When the kids heard that Obama had won, they went nuts cheering. I had no idea that 3rd graders were so into the political fray, or ...


Oakland science educator Anthony Cody, who grew up in a hub of student activism in the 60s and 70s, says he's never seen young people so excited about a presidential election....


Renee Moore also has some advice for the next president: Increase respect for teachers and "change the compensation system". She writes: One way to attract and keep effective teachers in high needs schools is a well-designed performance pay plan that recognizes and rewards the kind of teaching we know works with our most challenging students in our most demanding schools. Imagine a pay system that is designed to encourage and proliferate quality teaching in every classroom, not one that simply rewards people for showing up....


Scott McLeod is encouraging edubloggers to write a letter to the next president. Bill Ferriter (characteristically) wastes no time, telling the candidates to stop placing the blame for schools' woes solely on teachers: I think successfully educating all children in America requires something more than sounding warning bells and asking teachers to “pull up their boot straps” time and again. For me, improving education means being willing to significantly rethink how “school” is done in our country....


According to Will Richardson, the decline of print newspapers points to significant changes in the way information is being consumed, but schools have yet to catch on: The problem for us is that we’re still teaching like our kids are going to be reading those edited, linear, well-written newspapers when the reality is they’re not. And the bigger problem is that, by and large, we still don’t know enough about the “new” media world in our personal practice to push those conversations about change in any meaningful way. We better figure it out pretty quickly, or we’ll...


Bake sales might be a thing of the past for California schools. Robert Pondiscio of The Core Knowledge Blog reports that traditional bake sale sweets are being barred by new state nutrition guidelines. California schoolkids who want to raise money for field trips and extracurricular activities will have to think of something other than holding a bake sale. Cookies, cupcakes, pizza and other goodies exceed the fat, sugar and caloric limits set by the state’s legislature for foods sold on campus. State guidelines passed in 2005 limit the calories, fat and sugar content of snacks sold in California schools. ...


Doug Noon of Borderlands wonders how social justice teaching got such a bad name: Inquiring into our history, sources of power in society, current events, and discussing race and stereotyping does not preclude observing high academic standards. And there’s nothing subversive about such discussions unless you admit that the moral order has already been undermined. I’m not interested in indoctrinating anyone. My only agenda is activating some gray matter, and acknowledging the value of participating in public discourse, none of which is emphasized in any official reform agenda. Nancy Flanagan agrees: Please deconstruct this for me, a child ...


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