This may surprise you ed-techies out there: Will Richardson has some harsh words on Twitter, particularly regarding its effect on the edtech blogging community: I can’t help feeling like it’s just making all of us, myself included, lazy. We’ve lamented this before, this “fact” that the whole community is blogging less since Twitter, engaging less deeply, it seems. Reading less. Maybe it’s just me (again) or maybe it’s my long term attachment to this blogging thing and my not so major attachment to texting, but it feels like the “conversation” is evolving (or would that ...


Eduwonkette calculates that the black-white math achievement gap in New York City, in a best-case scenario, won't be closed for another 21 years....


At a recent conference, Happychik discovered that the hot new acronym in eduspeak is RTI, standing for Response to Intervention. She does some investigating on the Internet, and isn't very impressed: I don't want to judge this RTI stuff without truly knowing what I'm talking about, but I hope it's not coming to a school near me. I'd like to think we already have it--perhaps under different terms. Although I welcome new strategies to perfect my craft, I don't need than more than I have now. All I know is that this Ed Week story has gotten a crazy number ...


In an environment wrought with political, emotional, and social issues, educators are asked to use their best judgment when making decisions while also abiding by the law. However, not everyone makes the right decision and lawsuits often follow. Blogger An Audience of One takes education law classes so he knows when and when not to worry if a student threatens to sue. “We live in a litigious society and schools are often at the center of that litigation. I am always aware that as an agent of the state everything I do in the workplace is an official act. If ...


DC educator Camp Teacherman expresses angst over discussing New York Times’ best seller, The Kite Runner with his high school juniors: Tonight's reading covers the rape scene in chapter 6, and tomorrow we have a Socratic Seminar covering the book so far. I'm a little worried, as many of these students can be homophobic and might miss the point that Assef wasn't raping Hassan for sexual reasons. For those that haven't done SS before, the idea is that the teacher launches a question and then steps back and lets the class discuss and ask their own questions. Hopefully Camp Teacherman’s...


After reading a recent Associated Press article on summer school budget cuts, AssortedStuff’s Tim Stalmer thinks he sees an even better solution to allowing all students to have access to year-round educational activities: permanently end summer school programs in favor of establishing a more flexible school year calendar. “And is it possible that low-income kids fall behind over the 2-3 month break while affluent kids don’t for reasons that have nothing to do with summer school? So maybe, rather than just cutting back on summer school programs (and restoring them when the economy improves), we should take this ...


Although Ryan, blogger of I Thought a Think, agrees with The Flypaper blogger Liam Julian that teachers too often play the “How would you know, you’re not a teacher” card, he admits, with help from “famous education observer” Rambo, that the only way to truly understand the teaching position is to do just that—teach: “I think it can be universally accepted that teaching requires a certain skill set to transmit information to the students and get them to retain it. There's a science to teaching, and there's an art to teaching. I don't think it's out of line ...


An e-mail from a former student gives Mr. McNamar of The Daily Grind the gratifying sense that his work has been done: "While reading the e-mail, the corners of my mouth moved upwards, and I chuckled outloud. She had learned to be a pioneer woman, to forge her own path, to listen to her life and what it was saying. Can I really take credit for that, who knows? What I do know is that I am extremely proud of her, that I believe she will succeed and flourish while there." Cheers to Mr. McNamar! May all teachers recognize their ...


The news that Carleen Gulstad, Minnesota's 2008 Teacher of the Year, has relinguished the title for personal reasons has caused a minor uproar in the state and fueled some useless/idiotic speculation. But as a former state teacher of the year in Michigan, Nancy Flanagan has sympathy for Gulstad and guesses that her reasons for begging out might have something to do with curious nature of the TOY institution: It’s totally not my business, either—but I’m guessing she took a hard look at the schedule set for her to meet the demands of her “honor,” then very ...


In a post on NCLB reauthorization, J.M. Holland of Circle Time suggests that a return to state control over education reform efforts would be more conducive to effective teaching: In our current situation I can’t help but think of the decision to leave education to the states and out of the constitution, as a good decision. By leaving education up to the states we have had a continually improving national school system. A pluralistic approach enabled states to adopt best practices and still empower communities to try to “do” education their own way. This combination of flexible pluralism ...


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