In a post on the disconnect between top-down education policy and on-the-ground realities, Doug Noon reacts to the recent report on the ineffectiveness of the federal Reading First program. He's not suprised: One of the core issues in current policy discussions is from what level curriculum control should emerge. Top down program administration too easily misses the fine print and messy details that come with the teacher’s territory. The only people who are surprised by a billion dollar per year program bust are the clueless pundits and policy pushers who believe that “scientifically based reading research” is about science ...


A charter high school in Wilmington, Del., will be the first to train its students to become part of Homeland Security. The Delaware Academy for Public Safety and Security will train as many as 600 of Wilmington’s inner-city youth in areas such as prison guarding, professional demolition, and special weapons. Cadets, as they will be called, will learn Arabic, Chinese, or Russian as part of the curriculum. But a concerned ParentDish blogger who says the move is “reminiscent of the Hitler-Jugend,” is not convinced. Maybe this will turn out to be the best thing since sliced bread … [but]…It ...


A must read over on edweek.org: Eduwonkette examines controversy surrounding social justice teaching in education schools, and elicits reponses in defense from Bill Ayers—yes, that Bill Ayers—and in opposition from Sol Stern of the Manhattan Institute. Some samples: Eduwonkette: In short, it’s not clear that “social justice teaching” is a coherent and distinctive pedagogy that’s taught at schools of education across the country . It’s also worth noting that teachers are relatively conservative. If education schools have been engaged in an active project to disseminate social justice teaching, they largely have been unsuccessful. Ayers: Practically...


Ms. Frizzle was also interested in attending the upcoming education bloggers summit in D.C., but points out that its timing virtually excludes the very folks who are, as they put it, "in the trenches." Most of the people I know who blog about education also happen to be teachers… and this summit is on a Wednesday-Thursday. It makes me a little sad & irritated that a summit intended to be about education reform would occur at a time that is virtually impossible for any actual working educators to attend. We have an obligation to our kids to be present pretty ...


Mister Teacher questions (to put it mildly) his school's decision to send home report cards the day before students take state tests: I'm sure that there was absolutely no chance of any risk whatsoever regarding student confidence being lowered due to a less than desired grade. Hey, maybe tomorrow morning right before they put pencil to the test, we can tell them all they were adopted!!...


TMAO finds it absurd that, for an upcoming ed blogging conference in Washington, he's been slotted to be on the panel for a session titled "Blogging From the Trenches": [It's] one of those ed phrases that just drives me nuts. My job is difficult, and on days like yesterday, appallingly frustrating, but no one's chucking mustard gas at me and I've never been asked to charge a fortified position, so maybe we could dial down the rhetoric a wee bit, hmm? No need to make teaching more dramatic than it already is, I guess...


The Teachers Leaders Network has launched a new blog by Ariel Sacks, a young NYC English teacher who's already gained a voice as an educator-writer to watch. In an early post on the blog, she writes with honesty about the conflicts she has over her grading system: Recipe formulas for calculating grades tend to turn out numbers that represent a mishmash of student effort (as perceived by teacher), task completion (which may not require effort for all students), knowledge acquired, and skill development (both evidenced in student work). Lately I’m struggling with the creeping notion that the net result ...


Planning on doing a Master's thesis in education? Apparently, it's advisable (or unavoidable) to use the word "quintile" a lot....


The social disadvantages and day-to-day tribulations faced by low-income students are all too real, says Mr. ab. All the more reason, he contends, that educators need to avoid letting them get in the way: The necessity of learning to read or add does not decline with the difficulties of life. By now, millions of children, of all colors and countries, have acquired their basic skills despite the grandest obstacles. I don’t know what common strengths they have shared ... but I deeply suspect that one asset was not a teacher so “understanding” as to permit them to fail. As a ...


More frustration about school adminstrators' lack of respect for teachers, from J. at Mildly Melancholy after she's hit by unannounced scheduling interruptions: I feel like they're saying to me, "Eff you. We don't care about you or the fact that you're actually doing your job. Do whatever random [$!] we throw at you, because actually teaching and setting good examples for the children is at the end of the priority list." Looks like she's quitting. The lesson for administrators: Try communicating....


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • rick: The implication are if a State doesn't require keyboarding mastery read more
  • Jess: My high school History teacher once got onto this subject read more
  • Mister Teacher: OK, OK, you got me Julie. My master plan has read more
  • Julie: Cutting and pasting to make flip books for classroom decorations read more
  • michelle: I'm glad that you got "all but five" back. And read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here

Tags