To motivate her students to turn in their homework, Bluebird's Classroom implemented a few controversial practices, including, giving students the answers to their homework. Homework is, after all, practice. If a kid doesn't get it, and does the homework wrong (if he does it at all), then he's repeating the wrong thing. He's learning and remembering something that is wrong. However, if you give the kid a key to check the work, then they're doing it correctly, and learning it correctly. It’s not for everybody Bluebird admits, but she says it’s worked wonders in her classroom....


The previous post may make you question whether students should be allowed to bring cell phones to school, but Will Richardson has a different view. For Richardson, just back from a visit to an NYC high school, school cell-phone bans make little economic or educational sense, from a big-picture perspective. The goal, he says, should to be teach kids how to use phones constructively for learning: To me, this is the vision thing again. In a school where there are about 300 computers for 3,000 students, doesn’t it make more sense to get creative about not only how ...


Scott McLeod of Dangerously Irrevelvant posts a selection of videos of classroom incidents caught on students' cellphones. It's not, I'm afraid, a very flattering portrait of the teaching profession—or of schools in general. Hat Tip: Learn Me Good....


Conservative-leaning education pundit and think tank leader Chester Finn has recently published an education-reform memoir, as well as an article on the lessons he's learned over the course of his career. Veteran teachers Susan Graham and Nancy Flanagan each have some ... well, let's just say, some thoughts on the matter....


Bill Ferriter warns against the tendency to equate teacher leadership with new-teacher mentoring. He asks: Does the belief that mentoring = teacher leadership limit the impact that can we have on other areas of our profession because no one is particularly inclined to see us as anything other than strong shoulders of support for beginning teachers?...


Susan Ens Funk grapples with the perennial question of how to get her 4th and 5th grade boys more interested in reading. Doug Noon, referencing a literacy text, responds that part of the problem may derive from literacy teachers' traditional emphasis on "literature to the exclusion of critical approaches to non-narrative texts. Boys tend to like informational texts more than literature." A greater emphasis on informational texts, he adds, might also make more sense in the present cultural context: And I’m not thinking about the boys’ problems with reading here, especially, as much as I’m reconsidering the how ...


Epiphany in Baltimore, a high school English teacher and baseball coach, says coaching has made him try to be a better person....


Hobo Teacher doesn't take particularly well to a request that teachers at his school perform a country line dance at this year's after-prom social event: You might as well ask me to dance to an organ grinder because I see no difference between two. I am a schooled professional given a task to educate the next generation in a system that ties teachers hands at every twist and turn. I refuse to participate in something that chips away at the little dignity we must hold on to....


In a really nice post, Renee Moore shares some early-career excerpts from her personal teaching journal. Here, in an absolute gem, our young English teacher finds a teachable moment in the cultural preconceptions (not to say cluelessness) of an ACT practice item: Today during our class opening grammar activity, we came across the following sentence: “I took my dog Sam to the lake who was lame.” One of the students found this in an ACT practice exercise. The author’s intention is to create a misplaced modifier by suggesting the lake is crippled rather than Sam, the dog. However, my ...


Will Richardson argues that online learning networks represent a transformative opportunity for the teaching profession, but laments that most teachers don't realize it yet: But I would still venture to guess that 75% (maybe more) of educators in this country still don’t know that they can have a network. While most of our kids are hacking away at building their own connections outside of their physical space, most of their teachers still don’t have a firm grasp of what any of it means or what he potentials are. And even for many that do know it, there are ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • rick: The implication are if a State doesn't require keyboarding mastery read more
  • Jess: My high school History teacher once got onto this subject read more
  • Mister Teacher: OK, OK, you got me Julie. My master plan has read more
  • Julie: Cutting and pasting to make flip books for classroom decorations read more
  • michelle: I'm glad that you got "all but five" back. And read more

Archives

Categories

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here

Tags