Hobo Teacher describes some unusual habits he's developed for dealing with his "teacher withdrawal": Why the other day I told an entire diner full of people to stay seated until I finish taking attendance. Plus, I keep setting a kitchen timer to 46 minutes to simulate the school's schedule.Also, check out why his yearning for order hasn't made him desperate enough to teach summer school....


Mrs. Bluebird of Bluebird’s Classroom details why she chose to take a “paid vacation” working at a summer camp for gifted students. Besides getting to visit with friends from her teacher-ed program, she's also looking forward to laid-back teaching lessons and the abundant supplies that she hoards for the coming school year: The classes are small, and you get time to actually do all that fun, hand's on stuff that I enjoy and the kids love. This year I'm teaching math, art, kites, and a new one on pioneers. I always ask to teach the last two weeks because, ...


NYC Educator, an ESL Teacher from the Big Apple, responds a New York Times article that says the schools chancellor will spend $106 million to reduce class size, a growing crisis in the city. According to the article, the funds, if distributed evenly, would reduce class size by an average of only 0.3 to 0.8 students per class. This clearly means, for the overwhelming majority of kids, it will have no effect whatsoever. Furthermore, it appears you'll have to be extremely needy for this money to reach your classroom. The fact is, many schools are so overcrowded they ...


CaliforniaTeacherGuy posts a letter to a superintendent explaining why he can't take a position at a school where he really wanted to work. The reasons are financial....


Brian of An Audience of One loves his job as a school administrator in Tulsa, Okla., because he can make a difference in the lives of students. Unfortunately, he can’t make their choices for them. One of his students—a 7th grader—was recently arrested and charged with murder. He wasn't a particularly difficult student, says Brian, but he lacked motivation: I remember catching him in the hall a few months ago, asking him where he was supposed to be, listening to his lame excuses, putting my arm on his shoulder, and walking him to class. I told him...


Konrad Glogowski, from the blog of proximal development, is blogging about blogging—in his classroom. The high school teacher had his students keep track of their yearlong research projects on individual blogs and, at the end of the year, requested they take time from calculating their grades to tell him what they learned. Although many of his students felt strongly about their topics and enjoyed the blogging experience, most planned to stop researching once the school year was over. This is why he says June is the cruellest month. This is what happens when we compartmentalize learning into neat chunks. ...


Can’t make it to the annual National Educational Computing Conference (NECC), but you’re aching to know what’s going on? Or, you’re there and you need to have your fingers in every pie? NECC has a listing of international teachers and techsperts who are blogging from the conference. Check out Kids.Cable.Learning. The Cable in the Classroom’s Web site “advocates for the visionary, sensible and effective use of media in homes, schools, and communities.” The site explores the value and ethics of the Internet in today’s classrooms and offers free podcasts on related themes, ...


Jim Anderson, of Washington Teachers, reacts to an article from The Seattle Times that shows how standardized lessons, like those developed by committees in Bellevue, Wash., can inhibit learning. Bellevue Superintendent Mike Riley, who advocates for a nationally standardized curriculum, says an inconsistent curriculum is “at the heart of what’s wrong with education in America.” Riley modeled his managed curriculum, developed mostly by teachers, after this belief. Anderson prefers the system at his old school, where standardized lessons reflected teacher and student autonomy. Most importantly, he says, change came from the bottom up. We saw that certain students weren't ...


Mister Teacher of Learn Me Good sounds off on a Virginia school's strict no-touching policy, under which students can reportedly be sent to the principal's office for hugging or high-fiving. Seems a bit excessive, says Mister Teacher: Now if said hugging went on for 15 minutes and involved hands in suspicious areas, I could see the merits in this policy. And OK, so you don't want to promote sexual promiscuity amongst middle schoolers, thus the no handholding rules, but high-fiving??? Are you kidding me?… He offers a nuanced solution: Hey "school officials" (if that IS your real name), how about ...


British teacher, Mr. Chalk, ponders the “real reasons” why students can’t sit still or be silenced in class, including: Fed on a diet of sugary drinks and snacks throughout the day, many kids are in a constant hyperactive state. To excuse this, a whole load of medical problems have been dreamt up by drug companies eager to sell new products to the gullible. Every register is chock full of acronyms and excuses such as ADD, Bipolar Somethings, Aspbergers, Oppositional Defiance Nonsense and of course ADHD. Here's a handy tip: if your own child is naughty just send a letter ...


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