Renee Moore, a member the Teacher Leaders Network, says you can gauge a teacher's level of professional engagement by his or her answer to the question, "What you are you doing this summer."...


Fred the Fish of Are We Doing Anything Today? recently fell behind in grading, and it started taking her two hours a day to catch up. It got her to thinking: Though I'm sure someone, somewhere in the blogosphere has asked this before, how much time do people spend grading. Is your 55 minute prep period enough to cover your bases? Good question. And she's gotten some informative responses....


Mister Teacher of Learn Me Good uses former NFL running back Ricky William’s pay-per-play contract to devise a unique performance-based pay plan for teachers: Sign us on at some base salary -- let's say $25,000. But we can increase our take-home by documenting events from the following list. Teachers would get paid for every occurrence of the event, not just one time. Staff meeting ........................................................................$200 Fire drill ..............................................................................$150 Being pulled out of class to attend a meeting ...................................................................$500 Receiving a new child any day after the first day of class ......................................................................$1,000 -- if they don't speak English .................................................................$2,500...


Retired teacher Nancy Flanagan—now a doctoral candidate in education policy—thought it would be nice to go back to her old school as a substitute. Easier said than done: I calculated that it would take three days of subbing to cover the registration fee alone—not counting the unpaid day of substitute training by a real live former teacher, the fingerprinting fee (and the pleasure of spending a morning at the county jail to accomplish that), the original certificate replacement costs, and the darned TB test. It would be October before I broke even....


Sam at clean up on aisle life delves into issues of race and power in education, noting that the racial makeup of the teaching profession is by no means lost on minority students: Last year one of my students asked why I was white and he was black. One of my friends had her students tell her that she was not white, because she was nice to them. My roommate and I have discussed how obsessed our students become over our blue eyes. They are very aware of the differences between themselves and their teachers, which means they must be ...


Andy Carvin of learning.now has mixed feelings about a university's decision to deny a student her teaching degree after she reportedly encouraged youngsters in her student-teaching class to view her MySpace page, which contained a picture of her titled "Drunken Pirate": When the story first broke, I must admit I had my own knee-jerk reaction. What were they thinking? Denying a talented young woman her degree because of one stupid photo was crazy! But now that more information is coming out from both sides, I’m beginning to feel very torn about the situation. ... [I]t gets more complex ...


Karl Fisch of The Fischbowl passes along this cautionary Ad Council video to spur discussion on how to educate students about the potential dangers of posting images and videos of themselves online: The video has also served as fodder for spirited debate at Around the Corner v2, where Miguel Guhlin reacted by suggesting that all Internet posters, students and teachers alike, need to be "a bit thicker-skinned" when taking their lives online. A commenter accused Guhlin of "blaming the victims" for the misuse of their material. Guhlin responded by excerpting a related post by Pamela Parker at Texas Teacher Law, ...


Mr. McNamar, at The Daily Grind, may be a high school coach, but he no longer has much faith in the long-term value of high school sports. After writing as much recently, he was challenged by a reader who listed the many skills sports instill in athletes. In his response, McNamar claims that the athlete-as-superstar model of pro sports, the demands of helicopter parents, and kids’ not-so-exemplary work ethic render such skills no longer applicable. He finishes by stating: Coaching ... has become a win or be gone world where parents and politics have more influence than the coach with the ...


Teachers union watchdog Mike Antonucci has posted an inspired, bitter-funny video mashup about the National Education Association's attempt to collect more dues. Using low-budget sci-fi movie footage from the 1950s, he's cast NEA president Reg Weaver as a capricious alien ruler who hires thugs to squeeze money from charter schools and ultimately drop an atomic bomb on one. Union officials may want to duck and cover while viewing this one....


Ms. Cornelius of A Shrewdness of Apes puts springtime testing mayhem into perspective: But you know, really every day is "THE TEST," and there are things for which we cannot plan ... An education is a work in progress, and it does not end by spring testing or by graduation or even by dropping out. The lessons we impart and the information we give may not come to fruition in a students' life on our timetable. It may not seem to make a difference in time for the state test. But it may make a difference eventually. Such a philosophy can't ...


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