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Getting to the Source

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More on the subject of kids who don't get support from the adults at home: NYC Educator is surprised to find himself in agreement with conservative commentator David Brooks, who argues that a really good presidential candidate would take the approach that schools don't just need more money—they need programs to make sure kids are prepared to learn before they get to school. NYC Educator's thoughts:

The bold candidate will admit that kids who don't learn social skills at home don't carry them to school. Kids with caring parents become better students.

David Brooks suggests a program where trained nurses or older women pay scheduled visits to young mothers at home to teach them how to care for their kids and optimize their early childhood development. NYC Educator likes the idea:

It makes perfect sense to me. What do you think? Will we leave fewer kids behind if we help their moms early on?
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Is that the problem: that young mothers are simply unaware of how to care for their kids and optimize their early childhood development? I wonder if Mr. Brooks would give women paid time off work for these classes, since most of the young mothers he's talking about work.

Perhaps the problem isn't that young mothers need parenting classes, but that two-income families have become the norm for survival and parents simply aren't home enough hours to "optimize" their kids' early childhood development.

Perhaps the best kind of help we can give to families with young children is paid time off so parents actually have time to spend with their kids.

I work at a daycare and I can tell that the kids that are away from their parents longer tend to act out more for attention.

I noticed that older students acted out in need for attention when their parents were not around. It seemed to be a way to force them to give them attention.

The bold candidate will admit that there is a point where we stop trying to save the family and work on salvaging the child. In doing so we can change the direction of the next generation.

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