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First Year Highlights: Helping Our Students Become Better Readers

I'm taking the summer off from answering new questions while I work on my next book.

Instead, over the next two months, I'll be posting "collections" bringing links together from previous posts on common topics (classroom management, instructional strategies, etc.). I've published almost fifty separate "answers" over the past year, and thought that readers might find these summer compilations more accessible.

Today, I'll be bringing together all my posts on helping our students become better readers.

Over the summer, of course, I'll also be preparing future responses, so keep those questions coming!

You can send them to me at lferlazzo@epe.org.When you send it in, let me know if I can use your real name if it's selected or if you'd prefer remaining anonymous and have a pseudonym in mind.

Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of twelve published by Eye On Education.

You can also contact me on Twitter at @Larryferlazzo.

Here are this year's posts on reading -- I'm posting them in order of popularity (based on their number of "tweets":

1. Ways To Help Our Students Become Better Readers

Stephen Krashen and Richard Allington share their ideas on helping students develop a love for reading.

2. More Ways to Help Our Students Become Better Readers - Choice & Access

Teacher/Authors Regie Routman, Laura Robb, and Kylene Beers contribute their thoughts in this installment of the reading series.

3. Ways to Help Our Students Become Better Readers - Part Two

Nancie Atwell and Cris Tovani sent-in their responses for this post.

4.Ways to Help Our Students Become Better Readers - Part Four

This post featured recommendations from Kelly Young (my mentor), Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey and Carol Jago.

5. Advice From The "Book Whisperer," Ed Week Readers & Me About Teaching Reading

Donalyn Miller, the "Book Whisperer," my colleague Dana Dusbiber, and several readers contributed here. I shared my own suggestions, too.

I hope you've found this summary useful and, again, keep those questions coming!

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The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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