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What are Effective Strategies for Assessing Student Work?

David asks:

Schools are expecting students to do more problem solving, in response to Common Core assessments. Businesses complain graduates are not creative. In response, schools have students engage in innovative design projects. Most parents, though, grew up on letter grades and lessons out of textbooks. They don't see the value in rubrics and performance assessments. How do we assess these projects so students and parents appreciate and understand what and how well students have done?


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