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Q&A Collections: Classroom Management Advice

I'll begin posting new questions and answers in early September, and during the summer will be sharing thematic posts bringing together responses on similar topics from the past six years. You can see all those collections from the first five years here.

Here's what I've posted so far:

This Year's Most Popular Q&A Posts

Today's theme is on Classroom Management Advice. You can see the list following this excerpt from one of them:

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* 'Learning Self-Regulation' Is Needed on Path to Academic Success

In this post, Donna Wilson, Thomas Armstrong, Joe Hendershott, Jeffrey Benson, Mark Katz, and Jonathan Cassie contribute their thoughts on teaching students self-control.

* 'Self-Control Doesn't Just Happen, It Needs to Be Taught'

Robert Ward, Sue Defreyne, Allen Mendler, Daniel Rechtschaffen, Carla Tantillo Philibert, and Christine Brandt provide answers on how to help our students develop self-control.

* 'Student Autonomy Is a Prerequisite of Self-Control'

Thomas R. Hoerr, Libby Woodfin, Jenny Edwards, Dave Stuart Jr., Maurice J. Elias, and Matt Renwick share their suggestions on how we can help our students develop self-control.

* 'Self-Control Can Be Learned'

This post considers how teachers can best help students strengthen these self-control skills with suggestions from Bryan Harris, Dr. Jennifer Davis Bowman, Amanda Koonlaba, Nancy Steineke, Mike Anderson, and Jen Schwanke.

* Classroom Rules—Ways to Create, Introduce & Enforce Them

Lou Denti, Gini Cunningham, Cindi Rigsbee, PJ Caposey, and readers share ideas about classroom rules—what they should be, how they should be developed, and how to enforce them.

* 'Don't Fear' Students Who Challenge Class Chemistry

Kevin Parr, Gianna Cassetta, Allen Mendler, and Signe Whitson contribute their suggestions on how to respond to "difficult" or "challenging" students.

* Working With 'Difficult' Students—Part Two

Annette Breaux, Cheryl Mizerny, Jeryl-Ann Asaro, and Stan Croft share their responses on working with "difficult" students.

* How to Practice Restorative Justice in Schools

Shane Safir, Jen Adkins, Timothy Hilton, Crystal T. Laura, and Mark Katz share their commentaries on applying restorative practices in schools.

* Manage Classrooms Through 'Positive Relationships'

Karen Baptiste, Gianna Cassetta, Harry Wong, Rosemary Wong, and Julia Thompson share their classroom management recommendations.

* Detour 'Around the Danger Zones' of Classroom Management

Marcia Tate, Jenny Edwards, Patty O'Grady, and Ric Murry share their thoughts on classroom management.

* Positive Classroom Management Strategies—Part One

Educators Bryan Harris, Marcia Imbeau, Pernille Ripp, Gianna Cassetta, Brook Sawyer, and Julia Thompson share their advice in this post.

* Managing Classrooms by 'Teaching Students, Not Subjects'

Kelly Bergman, Patty O'Grady, ReLeah Lent, Barry Gilmore, and Bethany Bernasconi share their thoughts here.

* Response: Goal of Classroom Management Is to Have Power 'With,' Not 'Over,' Kids

Educators Dr. Debbie Silver, Richard L. Curwin, and Marcia L. Tate provide guest responses.

* Response: Keeping 'The Big Picture in Mind' While Managing Classrooms

This post features two special contributions: one from well-known educator (and regular contributor to this column) Suzie Boss, who talks about the tricky subject of classroom management specifically during Project-Based Learning lessons; and the other from ASCD author Jane Bluestein. In addition, I include multiple comments from readers.

* Several Ways to Connect With Disengaged Students

Assistant Principal Jim Peterson and author Jim Anderson share their suggestions. Jim's downloadable instructions for conducting "walk-and-talks" with students seemed to particularly strike a chord with readers.

* Several Ways to Respond to "Unpredictable" Student Behavior

Dr. Marvin Marshall and I share practical positive—not punitive—classroom management strategies.

* Classroom Management Suggestions—Part Three

My colleague and co-author (The ESL/ELL Teacher's Survival Guide) Katie Hull-Sypnieski and I share even more positive classroom management ideas.

* Classroom Management Advice From Readers of Ed Week Teacher

Nine experienced educators, including Nancy Gardner from the Teacher Leaders Network and David B. Cohen from Accomplished California Teachers, discuss the role of relationships and respect in the classroom.

* Several Classroom Management Ideas for Younger Students

Teachers Jane Ching Fung, Mathew Needleman, and Tom Hobson write about the particular classroom management issues of very young students and how best to respond to them.

* Several Classroom Management Suggestions—Part One

Author/Educators Annette Breaux, Roxanna Elden, Harry Wong, and Gary Rubinstein contribute their thoughts in this column.

Several Ways To Help Students Develop Self-Control

Professor and author Roy F. Baumeister discusses his research on self-contol as a resource that can be depleted—and then needs to be replenished. I share my experiences applying his research findings in the classroom.

* Classroom Management Suggestions From My Colleagues

Several of my friends and colleagues, including a California Teacher of the Year and an administrator who I consider my mentor in classroom management, contribute what they've learned through their experiences.

I hope you've found this summary useful and, again, keep those questions coming!

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