This week's "question-of-the-week" comes from Fitta Astriyani: How can I deal with unmotivated students? I'm a little bit frustrated when I know my students don't do their homework and sometimes they talk during my lessons. Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. The response to this question will be a multi-part series, so there will be plenty of space for readers' suggestions.You can also send questions to me at [email protected] you send one in, let me know if I can use your real name if ...


Regular readers of this blog know that Education Week recently published a e-book based on posts from this blog on classroom management and student motivation. It's titled Classroom Management Q&As: Expert Strategies for Teaching. It also includes new material, and you can read an excerpt from the book that appeared in The Washington Post. Also, Middleweb has recently published a review. I've done versions of Twitter "chats" for some of my previous books on teaching English Language Learners and on student motivation, and am kicking-off a two week chat today for this new book. The hashtag will be #classmgmtQA. ...


(This is the final post in a three-part series on this topic. You can read Part One here and Part Two here) This week's "question-of-the-week" is: What do you do when you're having a bad day in the classroom? How do you get over feelings of frustration? Who among us doesn't have a bad day now-and-then? This post is final post in a three-part series responding to this question. Part One included responses from Roxanna Elden, Allen Mendler and Julia Thompson. Part Two featured contributions from Terry Thompson, Renee Moore and Cindi Rigsbee. Today, in addition to sharing many comments ...


(This is Part Two in a multi-part series on this topic. You can read Part One here) This week's "question-of-the-week" is: What do you do when you're having a bad day in the classroom? How do you get over feelings of frustration? Who among us doesn't have a bad day now-and-then? This post is Part Two in a multi-part series responding to this question, so there is plenty of time for readers to continue sending in their suggestions. Part One included responses from Roxanna Elden, Allen Mendler and Julia Thompson. Today's post includes contributions from Terry Normal 0 false false ...


(This is Part One in a multi-part series on this topic) This week's "question-of-the-week" is: What do you do when you're having a bad day in the classroom? How do you get over feelings of frustration? Who among us doesn't have a bad day now-and-then? This post kicks-off a three-part series responding to this question, so there is plenty of time for readers to continue sending in their suggestions. Today's column has quite a line-up, starting with Roxanna Elden, who is one of the most engaging and entertaining education writers around. Her contribution is followed by guest responses from two ...


This week's "question-of-the-week" is: What do you do when you're having a bad day in the classroom? How do you get over feelings of frustration? Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. The response to this question will be a multi-part series, so there will be plenty of space for readers' suggestions.You can also send questions to me at [email protected] you send one in, let me know if I can use your real name if it's selected or if you'd prefer remaining anonymous and have ...


(This is the last post in a three-part series on this topic. You can see Part One here and Part Two here) Elizabeth W. Rivero asked: If teachers assign reading as homework and the students are not completing the reading at home, what do you do to get them to do it, other than assign questions? This question has generated a lot of interest! Part One included responses from educators Donalyn Miller and Myron Dueck, and I threw in my "two cents worth," too. Dina Strasser and Ariel Sacks shared their thoughts in Part Two. I'm highlighting a guest response ...


(This is the second post in a three-part series on this topic. You can see Part One here) Elizabeth W. Rivero asked: If teachers assign reading as homework and the students are not completing the reading at home, what do you do to get them to do it, other than assign questions? This question has garnered a lot of interest, and I'll be including readers' suggestions in a post next week (of course, there is always room for more!). Part One included responses from educators Donalyn Miller and Myron Dueck, and I threw in my "two cents worth," too. Dina ...


(This is the first post in a three-part series on this topic) Elizabeth W. Rivero asked: If teachers assign reading as homework and the students are not completing the reading at home, what do you do to get them to do it, other than assign questions? This question has garnered a lot of interest, and I'll be including readers' suggestions in a post next week (of course, there is always room for more!). Today, in addition to sharing my own response, you'll find contributions from two other guests -- educators Donalyn Miller and Myron Dueck. You might also want to ...


Elizabeth W. Rivero asks: If teachers assign reading as homework and the students are not completing the reading at home, what do you do to get them to do it, other than assign questions? Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. The response to this question will be a multi-part series, so there will be plenty of space for readers' suggestions.You can also send questions to me at [email protected] you send one in, let me know if I can use your real name if it's ...


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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