The last in a four-part series on parent engagement. Today's post highlights responses from Darcy Hutchins and Mai Xi Lee, along with many readers' comments.


Today's post features contributions from educators Catherine Compton-Lilly, Dr. Sherrel Bergmann, Dr. Judith Brough and Maurice J. Elias commenting on effective parent engagement strategies.


I've just begun a weekly ten minute BAM! Radio Network podcast where I interview a couple of guests who have written responses to the "question-of-the-week" at this blog.


(This is the second in a multi-part series on this topic. You can see Part One here.) Cheryl Suliteanu asked: How do we educate families about the ways in which they can support their children, without insulting their trust in us to do what's best, and while not placing blame?Katy Ridnouer, Janice Fialka, and Joe Mazza provided their guest responses in Part One of this series. Today, Jane Baskwill, Julia Thompson and Bryon V. Garrett share their thoughts. I hope readers will continue to contribute their ideas, and I'll be highlighting those comments next week. Response From Jane Baskwill ...


(This is the first in a multi-part series on this topic) Cheryl Suliteanu asked: How do we educate families about the ways in which they can support their children, without insulting their trust in us to do what's best, and while not placing blame? This question, or some variation on it, is an ongoing issue for educators: How do we best promote parent engagement? In fact, it's been a topic of four previous posts, and you can find them all here. But I don't think it's possible to explore such an important topic too much, so today I'm beginning a ...


Art Markman, PhD is a professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of Smart Thinking (Perigee Books), which he discussed at a post here last year. His latest book is titled Smart Change: Five Tools To Create New and Sustainable Habits In Yourself and Others. I asked him a few questions about it, and how its ideas could be applied in the classroom. I'll be responding to last week's question, How Can We Best Engage Families, later this week in a multi-part series. There is still plenty of time to contribute your response. ...


Cheryl Suliteanu asks: How do we educate families about the ways in which they can support their children, without insulting their trust in us to do what's best, and while not placing blame? Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. There will be plenty of space for reader comments. And there will be plenty of time to submit them -- I'll be publishing an interview with an author in a few days and won't be posting responses to this question until later in the week.You can also send ...


(This is the last post in a two-part series on this topic. You can see Part One here.) Attilio Galimberti asked: What are best practices to make a flipped classroom model work? Part One in this series included guest responses from enthusiastic proponents of the flipped classroom like Peter Pappas and Andrew Miller, while Josh Stumpenhorst shared reservations similar to mine in his response. Today's post includes positive responses from educators Jonathan Bergmann and Troy Cockrum, along with comments from readers. In addition, it should include the first weekly ten minute BAM! Radio Network podcast I'll be doing with guests ...


(This is the first post in a two-part series on this topic) Attilio Galimberti asked: What are best practices to make a flipped classroom model work? I have to say that I have absolutely no experience with a flipped classroom (the term commonly used to describe the practice of having students view instructional videos as homework and therefore creating more time in class for personalized instruction), so I called on several educators who did to respond to Attilio's question. But, not having experience doesn't preclude me from having an opinion :) or from creating a balanced list of resources at The ...


I'll get back into the regular schedule of "questions of the week" next week, but I thought readers might find it useful to see the ten most popular posts from this blog in 2013. You might also be interested in: The 10 Most Popular 'Classroom Q & A Posts' of 2012 The 10 Most Popular 'Classroom Q & A Posts' of 2011 But, before I list them, I wanted to invite you to contribute a question to be answered in a future post. You can send one to me at [email protected] you send it in, let me know if ...


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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