(This post is Part Two in a two-part series. You can see Part One here) This week's "question of the week" is: "What does research say about use of ability groups/tracking, and how have you seen it used or misused? What are workable alternatives?" Part One in this series shared resources on the topic of ability grouping/tracking, and author/educator Rick Wormeli shared a guest response to the question. Today, Carol Burris, New York's 2013 High School Principal Of The Year, and Tammy Heflebower, Vice-President of the Marzano Research Laboratory contribute their thoughts, along with comments from readers. ...


(This post is Part One in a two-part series) This week's "question of the week" is: "What does research say about use of ability groups/tracking, and how have you seen it used or misused? What are workable alternatives?" Grouping by ability has been receiving particular attention recently due to a Brookings Institution study, and you can learn more about the discussion at The Best Resources For Learning About Ability Grouping & Tracking. Today, author/educator Rick Wormeli will be sharing his thoughts on the topic. Part Two of this series will feature several guest responses, including ones from Carol Burris, ...


This week's "question of the week" is: "What does research say about use of ability groups/tracking, and how have you seen it used or misused? What are workable alternatives?" Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of seven published by published by Jossey-Bass. You can send questions to me at [email protected] you send in your question, let me know if I can use your real name if it's ...


Mary Jo Groeneveld asked: What are some tools teachers can use to address new common core standards while developing creative thinking? Teachers are in a constant vice grip of time with too much curriculum to cover with unrealistic differentiation expectations for ever increasing numbers of students. They have a hard time justifying the time needed to move away from focused cognition. Do you have a collection of quick techniques, "tools" that teachers can insert easily, thus successfully into their structured, fast paced test and retest and report data regimen? Today, three author educators -- Amy Benjamin, Ben Curran, and Heather ...


Mary Jo Groeneveld asks: What are some tools teachers can use to address new common core standards while developing creative thinking? Teachers are in a constant vice grip of time with too much curriculum to cover with unrealistic differentiation expectations for ever increasing numbers of students. They have a hard time justifying the time needed to move away from focused cognition. Do you have a collection of quick techniques, "tools" that teachers can insert easily, thus successfully into their structured, fast paced test and retest and report data regimen? Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, ...


Cheryl Suliteanu asked: What are teachers doing to build communication, understanding, and empathy between teachers and families whose lives are dramatically different? Lifestyles, religion, poverty, and political views are just some of the differences we face daily - some teachers openly criticize families for the choices they're making. It's not only inappropriate, it's counter-productive to student achievement. I'd like to know how others may be overcoming this challenge. Cheryl (who, by the way, was just voted the winner of Goldman Sachs' "Innovation in U.S. Education " essay contest) asks a question critical to our success as educators. I've previously posted ...


Cheryl Suliteanu asks: What are teachers doing to build communication, understanding, and empathy between teachers and families whose lives are dramatically different? Lifestyles, religion, poverty, and political views are just some of the differences we face daily - some teachers openly criticize families for the choices they're making. It's not only inappropriate, it's counter-productive to student achievement. I'd like to know how others may be overcoming this challenge. Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book ...


Margaret Ridgeway asked: In a recent blog you dealt with student engagement. I have a related question that came up as I was teaching summer remediation. I teach in a small rural high school in Louisiana where I see many students are disengaged in the classroom. During summer school, however, I also discovered some students are similarly disengaged with state mandated tests. Unfortunately, poor performance on tests for these students is not so much a measure of their abilities but more a symptom of their disengagement. Some see no reason to do well on them and do not even bother ...


Margaret Ridgeway asks: In a recent blog you dealt with student engagement. I have a related question that came up as I was teaching summer remediation. I teach in a small rural high school in Louisiana where I see many students are disengaged in the classroom. During summer school, however, I also discovered some students are similarly disengaged with state mandated tests. Unfortunately, poor performance on tests for these students is not so much a measure of their abilities but more a symptom of their disengagement. Some see no reason to do well on them and do not even bother ...


(This is Part Two Of a two-part series. You can see Part One here.) Louise Oppedahl asked: Because the language acquisition process is largely absent from the Common Core Standards, and teachers must use these standards, how can ESL teachers use them to teach our English Language Learners? In Part One of this series, I shared links to helpful resources along with responses from responses from educators Diane Staehr Fenner; William and Pérsida Himmele; Debbie Arechiga; and Julie Dermody. Today, along with comments from readers, I have two special contributions: one from the Understanding Language team at Stanford and the ...


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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