Cheryl Suliteanu asks: What are teachers doing to build communication, understanding, and empathy between teachers and families whose lives are dramatically different? Lifestyles, religion, poverty, and political views are just some of the differences we face daily - some teachers openly criticize families for the choices they're making. It's not only inappropriate, it's counter-productive to student achievement. I'd like to know how others may be overcoming this challenge. Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book ...


Margaret Ridgeway asked: In a recent blog you dealt with student engagement. I have a related question that came up as I was teaching summer remediation. I teach in a small rural high school in Louisiana where I see many students are disengaged in the classroom. During summer school, however, I also discovered some students are similarly disengaged with state mandated tests. Unfortunately, poor performance on tests for these students is not so much a measure of their abilities but more a symptom of their disengagement. Some see no reason to do well on them and do not even bother ...


Margaret Ridgeway asks: In a recent blog you dealt with student engagement. I have a related question that came up as I was teaching summer remediation. I teach in a small rural high school in Louisiana where I see many students are disengaged in the classroom. During summer school, however, I also discovered some students are similarly disengaged with state mandated tests. Unfortunately, poor performance on tests for these students is not so much a measure of their abilities but more a symptom of their disengagement. Some see no reason to do well on them and do not even bother ...


(This is Part Two Of a two-part series. You can see Part One here.) Louise Oppedahl asked: Because the language acquisition process is largely absent from the Common Core Standards, and teachers must use these standards, how can ESL teachers use them to teach our English Language Learners? In Part One of this series, I shared links to helpful resources along with responses from responses from educators Diane Staehr Fenner; William and Pérsida Himmele; Debbie Arechiga; and Julie Dermody. Today, along with comments from readers, I have two special contributions: one from the Understanding Language team at Stanford and the ...


(This is Part One Of a two-part series) Louise Oppedahl asked: Because the language acquisition process is largely absent from the Common Core Standards, and teachers must use these standards, how can ESL teachers use them to teach our English Language Learners? Louise raises a challenging question. I'm still just trying to "wrap my head around" the Common Core implications for teaching my "mainstream" students and, other than thinking a bit about more ways to incorporate academic language support for my ELLs (which is, of course, never a bad thing), my advice is rather limited. Others, though, have done more ...


Louise Oppedahl asks: Because the language acquisition process is largely absent from the Common Core Standards, and teachers must use these standards, how can ESL teachers use them to teach our English Language Learners? Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of seven published by published by Jossey-Bass. You can send questions to me at [email protected] you send in your question, let me know if I can use your ...


Alex V. asked: How can I help my school develop a culture of open practice where teachers are happy to be observed and look forward to observing and learning from each other, in a school where up until now observation has been used as a tool of evaluation and judgment from the administration without constructive feedback, thus demoralizing the teachers? Based on the readers responses to this question, it certainly has hit a chord. I've included many of those comments in today's post, along with guest responses from four educator/authors: Trent Kaufman and Emily Dolci Grimm; PJ Caposey, and ...


Alex V. asks: How can I help my school develop a culture of open practice where teachers are happy to be observed and look forward to observing and learning from each other, in a school where up until now observation has been used as a tool of evaluation and judgment from the administration without constructive feedback, thus demoralizing the teachers? Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of seven published by published ...


Katie Ciresi asked: What is the best approach teachers can take towards homework? I think the guest responses today, along with numerous reader comments, provide a great perspective on the topic. If you'd like to read more research and discover additional ideas, you might want to explore my collection at The Best Resources For Learning About Homework Issues. Todays guests are educator/authors Dr. Cathy Vatterott and Bryan Harris. Reader suggestions follow their contributions. Response From Dr. Cathy Vatterott Dr. Cathy Vatterott is the author of Rethinking Homework: Best practices that support diverse needs (2009): 1. Treat homework as feedback. ...


Katie Ciresi asks: What is the best approach teachers can take towards homework? Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of seven published by published by Jossey-Bass. You can send questions to me at [email protected] you send in your question, let me know if I can use your real name if it's selected or if you'd prefer remaining anonymous and have a pseudonym in mind. You can also contact ...


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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