(This is Part Two in a two-part series on this topic. You can see Part One here) Last week's question was: What is the best advice you would give to help an educator become better at teaching math? As I mentioned in Part One of this series, I have very limited teaching experience with math. Therefore, I'll defer to guest responses -- and reader comments -- from math educators. I do want to say, though, that people might be interested in the math resources I offer to my English Language Learner students, as well as the math materials I use ...


(This is Part One in a two-part series on this topic) Last week's question was: What is the best advice you would give to help an educator become better at teaching math? As someone with very limited teaching experience with math, I'll defer to guest responses -- and reader comments -- from math educators. I do want to say, though, that people might be interested in the math resources I offer to my English Language Learner students, as well as the math materials I use in the International Bacculaureate Theory of Knowledge course I teach. Today, educators José Vilson, Shawn ...


This week's question is: What is the best advice you would give to help an educator become better at teaching math? Please share your thoughts in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. The responses to these questions are going to turn into a multi-part series, so there will be plenty of room for contributions from readers. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of seven published by published by Jossey-Bass. You can send questions to me at [email protected] you send ...


I'll get back into the regular schedule of "questions of the week" this coming Friday, but I thought readers might find it useful to see the ten most popular posts from this blog in 2012. In case you missed it, you might also be interested in The 10 Most Popular 'Classroom Q & A Posts' of 2011. But, before I list them, I wanted to invite you to contribute a question to be answered in a future post. You can send one to me at [email protected] you send it in, let me know if I can use your ...


This is the final post in a three-part series where educators share the most effective ways to use tech in the classroom.


(This is Part Two in a three-part series on this topic. You can see Part One here) Last year, Carla Arena asked: How do teachers make informed decisions in relation to a balanced use of technology in the classroom? I answered the question at that time, along with guests Richard Byrne and Marsha Ratzel. You can see our responses here. However, since it was an early question that appeared when this blog's audience was much smaller than it is now, I thought it would be worth highlighting it again for a follow-up response. As I mentioned in Part One of ...


Educators offer specific suggestions on using technology to support the learning process.


Last year, Carla Arena asked: How do teachers make informed decisions in relation to a balanced use of technology in the classroom? I answered the question at that time, along with guests Richard Byrne and Marsha Ratzel. You can see our responses here. However, since it was an early question that appeared when this blog's audience was much smaller than it is now, I thought it would be worth highlighting it again for a "Part Two" response. Please share your thoughts in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. The responses to these questions ...


This final post in a five-part series on teaching writing provides tools to help students develop their self-confidence and advice to educators on how to use them.


(Note: This is the fourth post in a multi-part series on teaching writing. You can see Part One here, Part Two here, and Part Three here) Katie Ciresi asked: What advice can you give to help teachers be more effective in helping students become better writers? This series is a companion to last year's five posts on Helping Our Students Become Better Readers. This series began with guest responses from Mary Tedrow, Doug Fisher and Nancy Frey. Another three educators -- Aimee Buckner, Carolyn Coman and Tanya Baker -- contributed their ideas in Part Two. Educator and author Ralph Fletcher ...


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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