Brittany Peppers asks: I am excited to follow this blog and learn many things about it as I graduate from college and begin my teaching career. My question to you is "In your opinion, what is one thing to remember about classroom management if you don't remember anything else you are taught about it?" Brittany, I'm glad you're finding this blog useful, and thanks for asking such a thought-provoking question. I'm looking forward to hearing suggestions from readers. The response to Brittany's question will be a three-part series: * Part One will share responses from several authors of books on classroom ...


S.H. asked: Our school culture has a growing sense of [unhealthy] competitiveness. I believe a lot of this stems from the fact that our administration does not recognize (or maybe they do and simply don't voice) teacher expertise using specific, positive praise. We do receive thanks yous - but they tend to be blanket statements and pretty general. (For example, "Thank you Ms. _____ for helping your team out.") This appears to have led to some teachers to measure themselves against others. Rather than feeling grateful that the students in our school are being taught by many talented teachers, it ...


S.H. asks: Our school culture has a growing sense of [unhealthy] competitiveness. I believe a lot of this stems from the fact that our administration does not recognize (or maybe they do and simply don't voice) teacher expertise using specific, positive praise. We do receive thanks yous - but they tend to be blanket statements and pretty general. (For example, "Thank you Ms. _____ for helping your team out.") This appears to have led to some teachers to measure themselves against others. Rather than feeling grateful that the students in our school are being taught by many talented teachers, it ...


Last week, I asked a question that had been on my mind: How can you tell the difference between good and bad education research? Colleagues in the Teacher Leaders Network and I have previously written about the importance of having a certain amount of healthy skepticism about research in the field, and I've written about the importance of being data-informed instead of being data-driven. Even then, though, we need to be careful about which data is informing us, and how it is being interpreted. In addition, I've compiled additional resources at The Best Resources For Understanding How To Interpret Education ...


In addition to responding the questions submitted by readers, now and then I pose a question that's been on my mind and that I believe others might find interesting. This is a week for one of those questions, and it's: How can you tell the difference between good and bad education research? Colleagues in the Teacher Leaders Network and I have previously written about the importance of having a certain amount of healthy skepticism about research in the field, and I've written about the importance of being data-informed instead of being data-driven. Even then, though, we need to be careful ...


An educator who prefers to remain anonymous asked: How do you go about teaching critical thinking skills? I try to infuse critical thinking during much of my teaching, and have particularly found the "thinking routines" developed by Project Zero in Harvard useful. I describe in my latest book how I use two of their recommended questions: "What's going on here?" and "What do you see that makes you say so?" One other strategy I use is helping students understand the difference between opinion and judgment. It's a perspective shared by many community organizers (I was one for nineteen years prior ...


This week's question comes from an educator who prefers to remain anonymous: How do you go about teaching critical thinking skills? Boy, this is sure an important issue! And one where we often need to remember William Butler Yeats' often quoted comment: "Education is not filling a bucket, but lighting a fire." Please share your responses in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of twelve published by Eye On Education. You can send questions to me ...


(NOTE: This is the concluding post in a three-part series) Brad Patterson asked: Can we be friends with our students? Where do we create barriers? How about social-media wise? I'm interested to hear about your experience, lessons learned, regrets, what you would offer as advice for new teachers. Rick Wormeli provided his response in the first post of this three-part series. In Part Two, I shared how this issue relates to the differences between a "public" and a "private" relationship and Jose Vilson's response to Brad's question. Today, I'll conclude this series with two guest responses -- from Bud Hunt ...


(NOTE: This is the second of a three-part series) Brad Patterson asked: Can we be friends with our students? Where do we create barriers? How about social-media wise? I'm interested to hear about your experience, lessons learned, regrets, what you would offer as advice for new teachers. Rick Wormeli provided his response in the first post of a three-part series. Here in Part Two, I'll first share my own thoughts on how this issue relates to the differences between a "public" and a "private" relationship; followed by Jose Vilson's response to Brad's question, and then conclude with a number of ...


Brad Patterson asked: Can we be friends with our students? Where do we create barriers? How about social-media wise? I'm interested to hear about your experience, lessons learned, regrets, what you would offer as advice for new teachers. It's an important question with two key components. One relates to the question of how teachers and students view their relationships with each other on a broader level, and the other more narrowly in the social media realm. In fact, it's so important -- and it has so many nuances -- that I'll be devoting three separate posts responding to Brad's question. ...


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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