Attilio Galimberti asks: What are best practices to make a flipped classroom model work? Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. There will be plenty of space for reader comments. Critical reflections on the flipped classroom model are welcome, too. I won't be posting the response to this question until next week. Instead, in a few days, I'll be sharing a list of the most popular posts for the year from this blog. When I do publish the response, however, it will include a new feature -- the first ...


(This is the final post in a three-part series on this topic. You can see Part One here and Part Two here) Shawn Blankenship asked: What are strategies to close the gap between new ideas and implementation? The question may need to be adjusted a little, but many educators are reading, sharing, learning, and growing together. However, what are ways in which we can put these new ideas into action in a timely manner? I'm sure self-initiation, problem-solving, risk-taking and the freedom to fail and learn from such failure will be a part of the conversation. As a principal, I ...


(This is Part Two of a multi-post series on this topic. You can see Part One here) Shawn Blankenship asked: What are strategies to close the gap between new ideas and implementation? The question may need to be adjusted a little, but many educators are reading, sharing, learning, and growing together. However, what are ways in which we can put these new ideas into action in a timely manner? I'm sure self-initiation, problem-solving, risk-taking and the freedom to fail and learn from such failure will be a part of the conversation. As a principal, I would love to have some ...


(This is Part One of a multi-post series on this topic) Shawn Blankenship asked: What are strategies to close the gap between new ideas and implementation? The question may need to be adjusted a little, but many educators are reading, sharing, learning, and growing together. However, what are ways in which we can put these new ideas into action in a timely manner? I'm sure self-initiation, problem-solving, risk-taking and the freedom to fail and learn from such failure will be a part of the conversation. As a principal, I would love to have some strategies to close this gap. Shawn's ...


Shawn Blankenship asks: What are strategies to close the gap between new ideas and implementation? The question may need to be adjusted a little, but many educators are reading, sharing, learning, and growing together. However, what are ways in which we can put these new ideas into action in a timely manner? I'm sure self-initiation, problem-solving, risk-taking and the freedom to fail and learn from such failure will be a part of the conversation. As a principal, I would love to have some strategies to close this gap. Please share your thoughts in the comments or, if you prefer, feel ...


(This is the last post in a two-part series on the challenges facing male teachers. You can see Part One here.) This week's "question-of-the-week" was: What are the unique challenges facing male teachers? Do they have it easier, harder, or the same as women educators? Part One in this series included a few of my own thoughts and an extended piece by Chicago educator Ray Salazar. Today, New York City teacher José Vilson and Sacramento educator Alice Mercer respond. In addition, I've included many reader comments. Response From José Vilson Mr. José Vilson is a math educator for a public ...


(This is the first post in a two-part series on the challenges facing male teachers) This week's "question-of-the-week" was: What are the unique challenges facing male teachers? Do they have it easier, harder, or the same as women educators? I, for one, have thought about this issue for years. I'm sure being a male teacher provides me with certain advantages in the classroom -- one being an easier ability to more easily use, for lack of better phrase, classroom appropriate "trash talk" or "locker-room talk," to help build relationships with boys. On the other hand, so many of my students ...


I will be responding to the most recent "question-of-the-week" (What Are The Unique Challenges Facing Male Teachers?) in a few days. Today, I'm publishing a special post -- an interview with educator and author Jim Burke. Jim has written more than 20 books and is the founder of the English Companion Ning --the largest online community of English teachers in the world. He teaches at Burlingame High School, Burlingame, CA. His latest books are The Common Core Companion:The Standards Decoded, Grades 9-12: What They Say, What They Mean, How to Teach Them and a similar one for grades 6-8. ...


This week's question is: What are the unique challenges facing male teachers? Do they have it easier, harder, or the same as women educators?


(This is the final post in a three-part series on student motivation. You can see Part One here and Part Two here) Fitta Astriyani asked: How can I deal with unmotivated students? I'm a little bit frustrated when I know my students don't do their homework and sometimes they talk during my lessons. Part One of this series included responses from Cris Tovani, Josh Stumpenhorst and Eric Jensen. Part Two featured another "all-star" line-up of guests: Maurice J. Elias, Stevi Quate and Cindi Rigsbee. Today, educators Jason Flom and Barbara Blackburn contribute their thoughts, along with many comments from readers. ...


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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