Last week, I asked: How can we help students develop their creativity? In addition to ideas from readers, two well-known writers and researchers have contributed responses today: Jonah Lehrer, author of "Imagine: How Creativity Works," which has been at the top or near the top of The New York Times bestseller list the past few weeks (A portion of his response is adapted from the book). Ashley Merryman is co-author (with Po Bronson) of the New York Times bestseller, NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children Additional resources on this topic can be found at The Best Sources Of Advice On Helping ...


This week's question is one that I've been wondering about: How can we help students develop their creativity? Please share your thoughts in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of twelve published by Eye On Education. You can send questions to me at [email protected] you send in your question, let me know if I can use your real name if it's selected or if you'd prefer remaining anonymous and have a pseudonym in ...


(This is the second post in a two-part series on "habits." Part One can be found here) A lot has been published lately on "habits" -- how to create good ones and how to break bad ones. So, last week I asked: How can we help students develop good habits? In Part One of this series, Charles Duhigg, author of the new best-selling book, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, shared his responses to my questions on how to apply his research to our work in schools. Today, Professor Art Markman, author ...


(This is the first post in a two-part series on "habits." Part Two will be published on Wednesday) A lot has been published lately on "habits" -- how to create good ones and how to break bad ones. So, last week I asked: How can we help students develop good habits? Today, I'm lucky enough to have Charles Duhigg, author of the new best-selling book, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, sharing his responses to my questions on how to apply his research to our work in schools. I'm impressed by his ...


A lot has been published lately on "habits" -- how to create good ones and how to break bad ones. So, I thought it would be timely to propose a related "question of the week": How can we help students develop good habits? Please share your thoughts in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of twelve published by Eye On Education. You can send questions to me at [email protected] you send in your ...


Two readers have asked similar questions: Science Eduk8r: What do you do with the student who simply has refused to work? Mary B: I am a new teacher and have a position teaching in a high school. My question for you is how to respond to an apathetic student in my classroom? Many of us have had students in our classrooms who are disengaged. How can we turn that around? Before I introduce guests who will be sharing their ideas today, I'd like to point out some additional resources that relate to this topic: Daniel Pink, Dan Ariely, and I ...


Two readers have asked a similar question: Science Eduk8r: What do you do with the student who simply has refused to work? Mary B: I am a new teacher and have a position teaching in a high school. My question for you is how to respond to an apathetic student in my classroom? Many of us have had students in our classrooms who are disengaged. What do we do? Please share your thoughts in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Thanks to Science Eduk8r and to Mary B. for contributing their questions. Anyone ...


(This is the second of a two-part series on Ontario's schools. You can find Part One here) Much has been written about the high-performing schools in Finland and Singapore, but I've recently begun to hear more about our neighbors to the north in Ontario. So, last week I asked: What's going on in Ontario's schools? Part One in this series included guest responses from administrators, parents and teachers, including the President of the Canadian Teachers' Federation. Today's post will include a contribution from Professor Michael Fullan, along with several comments from readers. Response From Michael Fullan Michael Fullan is professor ...


(This is the first of a two-part series on Ontario's schools) Much has been written about the high-performing schools in Finland and Singapore, but I've recently begun to hear more about our neighbors to the north in Ontario. So, last week I asked: What's going on in Ontario's schools? I'll be posting Part Two of this series tomorrow night, which will include reader's comments. In addition, another resource worth reviewing is a report edited Linda Darling-Hammond and Robert Rothman titled Teacher And Leader Effectiveness In High-Performing Education Systems. Today's post will include a guest response from a teacher, an administrator, ...


Much has been written about the high-performing schools in Finland and Singapore, but I've recently begun to hear more about our neighbors to the north in Ontario. So, the newest "question of the week" is: What's going on in Ontario's schools? Are there readers our there more familiar with what's happening in Ontario? Do you teach there? How would you describe what's going on in Ontario's schools? Please share your thoughts in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from ...


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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