Donna Browne asked: "What is rigor?" You sure see that word around a lot these days in education circles, so it's definitely a timely question. Thanks, Donna, for asking it! My three guest responses today -- from Barbara R. Blackburn, Cris Tovani, and Ira Socol -- have varied "takes" on the question, as do several thoughtful reader comments. I have seen instances where the word "rigor" has been used to support mind-numbing instructional strategies and to criticize extraordinarily fruitful lessons. However, I might not be quite ready to jettison it from my vocabulary. That raises another question for me: How ...


Donna Browne asks: "What is rigor?" You sure see that word around a lot these days in education circles, so it's definitely a timely question. Please share your responses in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of twelve -- including my own -- published by Eye On Education. You can send questions to me at [email protected] you send in your question, let me know if I can use your real name if it's ...


(You might want to see previous posts in this series on reading: Part One, Part Two, Part Three & Part Four) This post is the final one in a five-part series on teaching reading. Even though I'm receiving plenty of questions from readers (but could always use more!), I periodically take on a "Question That's Been On My Mind." This post is a the fourth in an expanded five-part series responding to one of them: "What is the best advice you would give to teachers trying to help their students become better readers?" Professors Stephen Krashen and Richard Allington contributed their ...


(You can see Part One of this series here, Part Two here, and Part Three here) Even though I'm receiving plenty of questions from readers (but could always use more!), I periodically take on a "Question That's Been On My Mind." This post is a the fourth in an expanded five-part series responding to one of them: "What is the best advice you would give to teachers trying to help their students become better readers?" Professors Stephen Krashen and Richard Allington contributed their responses two weeks ago. Nancie Atwell and Cris Tovani shared their thoughts in last week's post. And ...


(You can see Part One of this series here and Part Two here) Even though I'm receiving plenty of questions from readers (but could always use more!), I periodically take on a "Question That's Been On My Mind." This post is a the third in a multi-part series responding to one of them: "What is the best advice you would give to teachers trying to help their students become better readers?" Professors Stephen Krashen and Richard Allington contributed their responses two weeks ago. Nancie Atwell and Cris Tovani shared their thoughts in last week's post. This week, Regie Routman, Laura ...


(You can see Part One of this series here) Even though I'm receiving plenty of questions from readers (but could always use more!), I periodically take on a "Question That's Been On My Mind." This post is a the second in a four-part series responding to one of them: "What is the best advice you would give to teachers trying to help their students become better readers?" Professors Stephen Krashen and Richard Allington contributed their responses in last week's post. Today, I'm lucky to have contributions from two other educators, thinkers, and writers who have also had a major impact ...


Even though I'm receiving plenty of questions from readers (but could always use more!), I periodically take on a "Question That's Been On My Mind." This post is a the first in a four-part series responding to one of them: "What is the best advice you would give to teachers trying to help their students become better readers?" I'll be sharing my own advice in a future post in this series, as well ideas from other guests and readers. I'd like to start off the series with guest responses from two educators who have had a major influence on how ...


Though I'm receiving plenty of reader questions (but could always use more!), I periodically instead decide to respond to a "Question That's Been On My Mind." This is another one of those times (I'll soon be returning to reader questions).... My question is: "What would be the best advice you would give to teachers trying to help their students become better readers?" Please share your responses in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of twelve -- ...


Glenda Robertson asked: "What are some highly-effective must-do social-emotional learning strategies that we can immediately incorporate into our classroom culture?" Social Emotional Learning (SEL) is sometimes also referred to as "character education." It's been receiving more and more attention recently, both from researchers and practitioners. I'm a big believer in helping students develop strategies to strengthen their perseverance, self-control, intrinsic motivation, and healthy ways to deal with stress and conflict -- among many other qualities -- and think it's fairly easy to integrate lessons with literacy development. I've gathered related resources and lesson plans at The Best Resources On Social ...


Glenda Robertson asks: "What are some highly-effective must-do social-emotional learning strategies that we can immediately incorporate into our classroom culture?" Social Emotional Learning is sometimes also referred to as "character education." It's been receiving more and more attention recently, both from researchers and practitioners. Please share your responses in the comments, or, if you prefer, feel free to email them to me. Anyone whose question is selected for this weekly column can choose one free book from a selection of twelve -- including my own -- published by Eye On Education. You can send questions to me at [email protected]


The opinions expressed in Classroom Q&A With Larry Ferlazzo are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed On Teacher

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments