A simple suggestion to help students who have difficulties with decimals.


David Ginsburg shares his process for helping struggling teachers become star teachers.


Teachers can only perform to their capability if they exhibit coachability.


Educators need to not just meet kids where they are academically, but emotionally too.


Last post I asserted that the more schools focus on coaching teachers rather than evaluating them, the more student learning improves. And now some great news to back up this assertion: Two urban schools, Esperanza Academy and Freire Charter, where I've coached math teachers are among the top 12 performing high schools in Pennsylvania (out of 682) based on 2012 student achievement growth in mathematics. (I've also coached English teachers at Esperanza, and their growth in reading ranks 46th out of 682.) Both schools have strong leaders and dedicated staffs who were doing great work before I started supporting them. ...


"A coach is someone who can give correction without causing resentment." -John Wooden In my experience, the more schools focus on evaluating teachers, the more student learning suffers. By contrast, the more schools focus on coaching teachers, the more student learning improves. Harry and Rosemary Wong write about the power of teacher coaching to improve student learning, and I'm honored that their latest column is about me. The article includes stories of two struggling teachers--a downtrodden rookie and a stale veteran--who not only turned things around in their classrooms but later helped other teachers succeed. And it's not just struggling ...


If you don't grade it, students won't do it. That's what many educators (and parents) think, and for good reason. Here's a clip from a coaching session where I recall my students' reactions when they found out I wouldn't be grading their work: Reactions like this would seem to validate the motivational power of grades. But what they really validate is the coercive power of grades. The power to compel some students to do something by giving them points for it. And the power to compel other students to not do something, since kids who lack confidence often blow off ...


Tweeting. Texting. Messaging. Friending. Skyping. Technology has brought people together when they couldn't be further apart. Yet it has also pushed people apart when they couldn't be closer together. It's not that we've become less interested in each other, but rather less capable of paying attention to each other. That's because our attention is being divided--if not dominated--by whatever gadgets are within our grasp, giving new meaning to the term "digital divide." And even when common courtesy tells us to focus on the people in our presence, many of us can't do it. That's right, can't do it. The lure ...


For educators the new year begins September 1, which means the time for resolutions is now, not January. And here's a perfect resolution for those of you who spend a lot of time and energy establishing and enforcing classroom rules: stop doing this. Instead, provide students clear procedures that will enable them to meet your expectations. Don't get me wrong. I'm not suggesting you try to control kids. That's what most disciplinary rules are about. Procedures, on the other hand, are about giving kids the structure they need in order to thrive. You can't do your best at anything if ...


Flipped instruction. Project-based learning. Cooperative groups. Mobile technology. Much of the discussion about effective teaching focuses on instructional tools and techniques, which makes sense since it's important to use the right methods at the right times in the right ways. And yet teachers with the same training, same curriculum, same resources, and similar students often get different results. A lesson that is energizing for one teacher's students can be tranquilizing for another teacher's students. And as notable as this is when teachers use the same approaches, sometimes it's even more notable when they use different approaches. As a new teacher, ...


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