A coach in Seattle writes the following: This is my first year as a literacy coach in a large elementary school. I'm being asked to do all kinds of jobs that have nothing to do with coaching including doing lunch supervision, putting up bulletin boards, translating and testing coordination! The hours I have for coaching keep being whittled down--unless I just work more hours and I'm already working over 60 hours a week. I don't know how long I can do this for. Stretched too Thin Dear Stretched, I read your email in an exhausted moment last night and drifted ...


Here's an email I received a few weeks ago from a coach who wishes to be anonymous: I'm a high school literacy coach in a large urban district. I work across a dozen sites that are considered our worst schools. The situation is dismal: inexperienced leadership, no trust amongst teachers and administrators, brand new curriculum, predominantly first year teachers, large scale systems that aren't working, no funding, and then there's poverty, gangs, and so on. I've been working in this district for many years and am increasingly feeling hopeless, frustrated, and enraged by what I see. I'm also a black ...


Jenny from Midland, Mich., writes: I have been in the middle school classroom for 20 years and have now accepted a new position as an instructional coach this year. I have three middle schools and maybe 100 teachers plus administrators to work with. Some teachers already know me, but others do not. What would you suggest as far as the best ways to encourage teachers to use me as a resource? Hi Jenny! Welcome to the wonderful world of instructional coaching. I staggered over this phrase a dozen times: "...100 teachers plus administrators to work with." My first thoughts: Wow! ...


Dear Coaches, For years I've been craving conversations with coaches and thinking about how there must be other lonely coaches somewhere. So I guess I shouldn't have been surprised when after my first post on this blog I received over 100 emails in 24 hours. They've continued to pour in from coaches all over this country and the world. There was lots of excitement for the idea of this blog and many thoughtful questions including: What do we do about the "resistant" teachers? How do we coach towards Common Core? How do we coach when there's no curriculum? How do ...


I'm going to come straight out and confess: I'm on a mission to see effective coaching programs in all schools. I dream of seeing coaches supporting teachers, principals, and superintendents, of coaches working with educators at all levels of an organization. This mission is driven by my belief that coaching might just be the secret to transforming our schools, good coaching, that is--coaching that attends to an educator's behavior, beliefs and being; coaching delivered by coaches who have a ton of support, rigorous professional development, and who practice a research-based model of coaching; coaching that is focused, intentional, and of ...


The opinions expressed in The Art of Coaching Teachers are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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