Albert Einstein once said that if he had an hour to save the world he would spend fifty-five minutes defining the problem and five minutes finding the solution. This suggestion gets to the heart of coaching in proposing a ratio of thinking to acting in response to what we perceive as a problem.


Planning for a coaching conversation is similar in some ways to planning a lesson--we construct a couple clear goals, design a route to meet those goals, anticipate the challenges that might arise, and review material that might be helpful.


I want to make another suggestion for coaching new teachers that is super high leverage and I can almost guarantee that it'll shift a teacher's practice. Here it is: Get in there and do some model teaching.


This is the time of year when I fantasize that all coaches, everywhere, are deep in the process of creating work plans...But what I really want to share with you is this graphic...


I've received a number of emails asking for advice when coaching new teachers--especially during these often challenging fall months. Let's start with considering what new teachers need...


A question I'm often asked at this time of year when relationships are being formed is: How can I gain the trust of the teachers I'm working with?


Any new coaches out there? Coaching is a wonderfully exciting and complicated craft, and one that can feel overwhelmingly complex when we first step into it.


Here's another blog by my colleague, Anna Martin. Last year (12-13) she was formally an instructional coach, but ended up intentionally engaging one of her clients in leadership coaching.


This month I have a special treat for you! Anna Martin, an instructional coach in the Oakland Unified School District, will be my guest blogger. I asked her to write about the experience of creating these End of Year (EOY) reports, and so here are her thoughts.


My understanding of coaching deepens with every year I coach. After this last year, I'm firming up my conviction that strategic planning is a key activity for a coach to be successful.


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