Although I've worked in this field of adult learning for about ten years, I have never had one, consistent, expert coach. I'm now experiencing what can happen when you receive weekly coaching from a master coach. Here are some of my reflections in this process.


This first Monday-after-winter-break can be hard for some of us who work in schools. I've noticed that folks show up with the greatest breadth of emotions on this first day back--ranging from optimistic and energized, to depressed and hopeless--and sometimes all of these at once.


Here's another transcript of a coaching conversation!


Today, Steve Sexton, one of the great leaders of our time, is being memorialized. If you have not heard of him, know this: he was a transformational school leader who contributed an immeasurable amount to children and to interrupting inequities.


Curious how I think about planning a coaching session? Read on.


In a series of blogs, I've explored five components to an equity-centered coaching approach. This post explores the last component: what an equity-driven coach says and does.


There are several components to an equity-centered coaching approach. Here are two of them: Listening and self-awareness.


This morning I received an email with this question: "As a new coach in a new position for my school district, what are my first steps? My title is ESL District Coach." Here's some advice.


"I'll soon become an instructional coach. I have no idea what I'm doing. Can you give me some suggestions for things I can do this summer to prepare?"


"I wish I could just crawl inside your mind and see what happens when you coach."


The opinions expressed in The Art of Coaching Teachers are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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