Did you know that November 4 is National Coach Appreciation Day? Well, it is!...But I want to back up a bit and tell you the story of how I came to this decision.


Albert Einstein once said that if he had an hour to save the world he would spend fifty-five minutes defining the problem and five minutes finding the solution. This suggestion gets to the heart of coaching in proposing a ratio of thinking to acting in response to what we perceive as a problem.


Planning for a coaching conversation is similar in some ways to planning a lesson--we construct a couple clear goals, design a route to meet those goals, anticipate the challenges that might arise, and review material that might be helpful.


I want to make another suggestion for coaching new teachers that is super high leverage and I can almost guarantee that it'll shift a teacher's practice. Here it is: Get in there and do some model teaching.


This is the time of year when I fantasize that all coaches, everywhere, are deep in the process of creating work plans...But what I really want to share with you is this graphic...


I've received a number of emails asking for advice when coaching new teachers--especially during these often challenging fall months. Let's start with considering what new teachers need...


A question I'm often asked at this time of year when relationships are being formed is: How can I gain the trust of the teachers I'm working with?


Any new coaches out there? Coaching is a wonderfully exciting and complicated craft, and one that can feel overwhelmingly complex when we first step into it.


Here's another blog by my colleague, Anna Martin. Last year (12-13) she was formally an instructional coach, but ended up intentionally engaging one of her clients in leadership coaching.


This month I have a special treat for you! Anna Martin, an instructional coach in the Oakland Unified School District, will be my guest blogger. I asked her to write about the experience of creating these End of Year (EOY) reports, and so here are her thoughts.


The opinions expressed in The Art of Coaching Teachers are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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