Any new coaches out there? Coaching is a wonderfully exciting and complicated craft, and one that can feel overwhelmingly complex when we first step into it.


Here's another blog by my colleague, Anna Martin. Last year (12-13) she was formally an instructional coach, but ended up intentionally engaging one of her clients in leadership coaching.


This month I have a special treat for you! Anna Martin, an instructional coach in the Oakland Unified School District, will be my guest blogger. I asked her to write about the experience of creating these End of Year (EOY) reports, and so here are her thoughts.


My understanding of coaching deepens with every year I coach. After this last year, I'm firming up my conviction that strategic planning is a key activity for a coach to be successful.


Join me today on EdWeek Teacher for a live text-based chat about instructional coaching!


I get a lot of requests for advice from coaches who deliver PD. Questions include: How do you engage all teachers when a small set don't want to be there?


I'm in an argument with my central office supervisors over the direction that our coaching program is going. They would like to link coaching with teacher evaluation and often talk about coaching as something to do to ineffective teachers.


One of the questions I receive most often is: "How did you get into coaching? How did you become a coach?"


I received a request for a way to quickly analyze a coaching conversation. "I just need something that gives me a quick sense of a coach's skills," wrote a coach from Florida. "I want to evaluate myself and give feedback to colleagues." Here's a tool that gives you an overview, snap shot of a coach's strengths and areas for growth as they show up in a coaching conversation. Coaching Conversation Analysis Tool.pdf You can find this tool, and many more, on my website. While you're there, check out my summer Art of Coaching Institute. There are limited spaces left ...


Many coaches have written asking for advice on how to coach resistant teachers, and they note that many of those teachers are "veterans." What is it with these older, entrenched teachers that makes them so difficult to work with?


The opinions expressed in The Art of Coaching Teachers are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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