I've received a number of emails from coaches asking for advice on where to start when supporting new teachers. Start with this video...


This week I'm posting a series of responses to the most common question I received: How can I coach a resistant teacher? Let's start with this: Some people are not coachable.


There's one request for advice that I receive more than any other from coaches: How can I coach a resistant teacher?


What's more effective--for a coach to work exclusively at one school (the "site-based coach") or to work across many schools (a "central-based coach).


A district leader in Colorado contacted me with a question about hiring coaches. He's thrilled that next year his small district will hire coaches to work with their most struggling secondary schools. "How can I hire good coaches?," he asks.


A "Director of Professional Development" from Iowa emailed this question: "I read the excerpt from your book on PD for coaches. Lately I've been exploring non-traditional forms of PD for the district I support and was wondering if you have ideas on that?"


What can a site-based instructional coach's schedule look like? Here's an example.


Excerpt from Chapter 15 of The Art of Coaching--What is Professional Development for Coaches?


Excerpt from The Art of Coaching--How to plan a coaching session


Excerpt on giving feedback from The Art of Coaching.


The opinions expressed in The Art of Coaching Teachers are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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