Julia Gelormino, a first grade teacher at Think College Now Elementary in Oakland, Calif., shares how she develops questions that involve peer input and produce a variety of responses. This strategy encourages English Language Learners to practice using academic language.


Kristin Gray, a math specialist at Richard A. Shields Elementary in Lewes, Del., explains how teachers can use "time-outs," or spontaneous but strategic breaks from instruction, to get real-time feedback from colleagues during lessons.


Teachers work together to learn more about what quality lessons looks like under the Next Generation Science Standards. Through use of the NGSS EQuIP rubric, the teachers evaluate lessons and learn more the instructional shifts entailed in the new standards.


Ninth grade English teacher Erin from Oceanside Senior High School in N.J., has students use peer feedback when revising their essays. Students critique each other's work to identify effective writing as they follow a five-step revision process.


Sherwanda Chism, a 4th and 5th grade teacher at Winridge Elementary School in Memphis, Tenn., posts students' work on the walls to increase engagement during their walk-around research activity.


Anne Mechler, a 5th grade teacher at the Momentous School in Dallas, Texas, guides her students through relaxation strategies to help them focus in the classroom.


Marica Venture, a 5th grade teacher at Maple Elementary School in Seattle, takes students through the engineering-design process, encouraging them to learn from their failures. Watch students collaborate to design and test microsatellites in a partner project with Boeing.


Nicole Gavin, a 2nd grade teacher at William Paca Elementary School in Baltimore, Md., shares how she scaffolded activities to support students' learning while promoting academic language. Watch students ask and answer questions to understand key details in informational texts.


Chuck Pack, a math teacher at Tahlequah High School in Oklahoma, discusses the importance of building relationships with students. He stresses that for learning to happen, students need to feel comfortable and connected.


High school English teacher Sarah Brown Wessling uses movement to help her students to take on active roles as speakers and listeners during class discussions.


The opinions expressed in Inspired Instruction: Videos From the Teaching Channel are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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