Fifth grade teacher Madeline Noonan uses transitions as an opportunity to embed academic content, using word-of-the-day activities and "grab bag" quizzes. She says these strategies represent both management techniques as well as learning opportunities.


After collaborating with colleagues, high school math teacher Krista McAtee devises a lesson meant to help students understand graphing.


Teacher Debora Gaten shows her elementary school students how to analyze imagery, figurative language, and their own emotions when reading poems.


Teacher Antoinette Pippin engages her 5th grade students in a "Claims, Evidence, Reasoning" protocol. Using what she calls "the trifecta of argument," she helps her students make claims and support their claims with evidence and reasoning.


To create an authentic learning experience, English language arts teacher Sarah Brown Wessling has her students analyze a text from the perspective of a reality TV producer.


Sherwanda Chism, a 4th and 5th grade teacher, encourages her students to use "accountable talk stems" to help them seamlessly build off of each other's ideas, ask questions, and participate in collaborative discussions.


In this 8th grade classroom, English-language learners engage in academic conversations, practicing "talk moves" like adding onto each others' responses, asking questions, and agreeing with what others say.


High school English teacher Sarah Brown Wessling challenges her students' thinking by having them apply their knowledge of a text and create a prototype of a person who pushes the limits.


In this video, learn more about the three dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards. You'll see teachers engaging in the types of activities that students might perform in the classroom.


In this lesson, students prepare to learn about the Harlem Renaissance by analyzing the points of view of stakeholders involved in the Great Migration.


The opinions expressed in Inspired Instruction: Videos From the Teaching Channel are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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